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Obituary Notice
Ron Sabey FSAA 19472017

Your Free Flight Events Pictures Here

Allan Brown
" I am pleasd as Punch, and have absolutely no idea that the wings will fold on the next flight ! !"

Scottish Aeromodellers Association

Free Flight Newsletter May 2017

Indoor Events

The F1L contest was held at Bathgate Academy on 16th April. There were three entries. The air is the hall was poor for the first half of the session. The cool rain falling on the roof outside was enough effect the internal air at the start of the session. Perhaps the hall lighting eventually off-set the cool ceiling as, after the first hour, the conditions were very stable and better flights were possible. Roger’s new F1L was distorting under power, mainly due to an overly soft tailboom. He soon abandoned it and enjoyed flying his pennyplane. Urlan was soon posting flights in the 7 ½ to 8 ½ minute range but had some unfortunate repairs to contend with, which prevented him improving further. Jim started peppering the 9 to 9 ½ minute range and finished with a two flight total of 18:58 for a clear win.

This F1L win saw Jim picking up the Aubrey Beaton trophy for the annual the indoor league.

While happy with his contest win, Jim was somewhat frustrated that another day had passed without getting any nearer to the Scottish record. Aubrey Beaton set the F1L record at 10:47 in Lochgelly High School in March 2000. When Jim achieved a 10:03 flight two years ago, he realised that he was getting within striking distance of what had previously seemed an impossible target. Jim decided to get serious about breaking that record. He sent for some top quality indoor balsa, like what Aubrey would use, and started building with a great deal more delicacy, weighing anything and everything. Despite these efforts his flight times continued in the 9 min to 10 min range. Now Jim was becoming obsessive about it, but if were easy it would not be worth doing. Prior to the April contest reported above, he had been testing rubber samples and managed to convince himself that his “best rubber”, with which he had been doing 9 ½ min flights was in fact below average. He had now found rubber that was at least 15% better. The beauty of F1L models is that you are flying in almost laboratory conditions and these details do translate into actual flight times in practise. So an 11 minute flight was expected. So why did he still get a best time of 9:35 ? There were two spoilt flights on the day which gave reason to believe an improvement had been made. There was a flight which was still grazing the underside of the girders at 4 ½ mins when it became deflected into the wall – that was heading for well over 10 mins. There was another flight which hung on a girder at 3:50 and then when knocked free it did a further 7:20. One has to grasp onto those little glimmers of hope.

On 6th May we were back at Bathgate, not for a contest but for a fun-fly / trimming day. Aubrey and Bruce were trimming Pennyplanes, but there was no question about what Jim wanted to do. The F1L box was open and the models were in the air very quickly. It was a pleasant day outside and the quality of the air inside the hall was improving as the session went on.

1

Bruce had a very good 6 ½ minute flight with this new Pennyplane.

After the frustration of having two potentially good times spoilt by hang ups, Jim made a pig’s ear of trying to steer the next flight out of trouble with the perch pole and badly damaged one of his two models. Very clumsy. However the next flight was good; 2:30 to climb to the girders, last touch at 3:30, and a slow descent for a 9:58 time. There were lots and lots of turns still on the motor, which means it was carrying “dead” weight. I decided to take 2” off the length of the 13” loop. That made the whole model 0.15 gm lighter to improve the cruise. On the next flight, the model hit the girders at 2:20, and grazed off underside until it made a last touch at 4:40. It had not hung up ! Still central in the hall. This was going to be good ! After 7 mins it was still cruising just a foot or two below the girders. And easing its way down very slowly. The next few minutes seemed interminable. 9 mins… 10 mins …. Bruce was calling out the time…. 10:30…. 10:47….11:00….it touched down at 11:35.

Jim had done it, a new Scottish F1L record is set. A further flight of 11:00 confirmed that it was no fluke.

2

Jim’s F1L which set a new Scottish record at 11:35.

What Next ? Well that model weighed in a 1.32 gm and the minimum allowed weight is 1.20 gm. If I could build down to the minimum weight without losing much rigidity, then that saving of 0.12 gms would be a 5% saving in the all up weight and..………

I will worry about that in the Autumn. In the meantime, where is the Sun – I need to get out more !

Power Championship and 4th Area Events

The weather forecast was a stiff 15/17 mph wind , gusting to 21-25 mph, coming from the Southwest.

This would mean heavy turbulence from the upwind trees and, for models that did get away successfully for a max, it would mean about a 1 mile flight distance. Realistically this is now a bit beyond what our IC power community can handle. The outing was cancelled and the Lawrie Trophy ( Power Championship ) will be rescheduled on a much better day when we can “enjoy” the contest.

( The Cabin Fever will have to continue a while longer )

British Nationals 27/28/29 May

Whitsun Bank Holiday Weekend can mean only one thing – the British Free Flight Nationals ! The self indulgent joy of three days of Free Flight contests on Barkston Heath airfield in Lincolnshire. It remains the biggest free flight jamboree in Europe with a multitude of events to suit all tastes. Three SAA members travelled South this year, David Hambley, Chris Edge, and Jim Arnott. A realistic assessment of their growing age saw David and Jim sidestepping the usual weekend under canvas in favour of the comforts of a lodge room at Woodlands Waters caravan park. It was a problem free journey down until South Yorkshire and then a bit of a stop/start drag for the remainder. On Friday evening, there was full size aircraft activity on Barkston until about 7pm. A stiff breeze thereafter put paid to thoughts of an evening trimming session, so we settled for a relaxing walk along the woody tracks around the fishing lakes of this picturesque caravan park.

On Saturday morning, the day started with a steady breeze of 12 mph from the Southeast. It was dry but quite chilly. Jim made an early start in BMFA Rubber, flying an Urchin with a 50 gm motor and saving his lighter Screwtop for the expected fly-off. The first flight was a comfortable max, which d/t’d down over the back of the compound into the margins of a field of young wheat. After a change of motor and with the breeze starting to freshen, Jim repeated this with a similar max flight. It was a very nice start.

David was hoping to fly his E36 Super Pearl in Open Electric, but found that he was unable to reprogram the timer to the 12 secs run allowance. By the time that David abandoned the E36 problem, and turned his attention to his Old Peculiar for BMFA Glider, the breeze had increased to an uncomfortable gusty 16/18 mph. On his first flight, the Old Peculiar whipped up so fast that David had to bail out rather than fold the wings. The model just recovered to land safely in 24 secs and David retired for the day.

The wind continued to increase through lunchtime and into the afternoon. There was very little flying going on. The BMFA Rubber scoreboard showed three others in the same position as Jim with two maxes and looking for an opportunity to make their final flight. Mid-afternoon the wind swung to be from the South-southwest and control was moved half way along the southern peri-track. Now severe turbulence over the upwind trees and hanger were added to the hazards. The four contenders waited until 30 mins before the close before making their attempts. Jim wound his Urchin and waited in the lea of his car watching the upwind trees to see if they would stop thrashing. Pete Woodhouse flew and his model was tossed around at low level and never got away. There was a slight diminishing of the thrashing trees and Jim launched. The Urchin tried hard to fight its way up but was getting thrown around viciously. Even half way across the drome the turbulence was severe. The Urchin landed at 1.41 near the windsock in the far corner of the field, 3/4rd a mile away. That was 27 mph wind ! Phil Ball waited until the last minutes and was rewarded with a slight lull. His Waif design handled the conditions beautifully for a comfortable winning max. When the scores were posted, Jim’s Urchin had done 1 second more that Pete Woodhouse’s model for second place.

What a difference a day makes ! Sunday dawned pleasantly warm with a 15 mph westerly breeze and a forecast that it would gradually get calmer throughout the day. David, Jim and Chris were all flying in F1a. While Jim and Chris started with a max, David missed the good air and was down in 1:53. In the second round Chris again maxed. Jim had good launch but into a poor choice of air for a 2:10. David was over-zealous in the tow and brought the zoom rudder on very early for a poor time of 0:53. In Round 3, Chris continued on very solidly with good high bunt launches. David gave up the chase. Jim maxed this one but on retrieving the model he found it inverted on the runway with the fin detached. Despite the benign conditions, fliers were finding it difficult to choose their air and get their launch right. In each round, about half of the field were missing their max. By the end of round 3, only five fliers had a full house, including Chris. In round 4, Chris maxed again. One of the five leaders spoilt his card leaving four clear. Jim’s fin repair was not straight and his model was released going left for a 1:04 flight that dropped him out of contention. In the final round, John Cooper dropped from the shared lead with a surprising 2:27, leaving Chris, Stu Darmon, and Peter Tribe in a three way fly-off.

By fly-off time, the wind had gone and it was so calm that the flights were taken from the centre of the airfield. A 9 minute max was specified as the tie-breaker, but all three F1a were some floating upwards in the gently rising air that seemed to be oozing off the whole field. Unluckily for Stu Darmon, his timer had a limit of 8 minutes and he was down in 8:40 for third place, while Peter and Chris cleared the nine minute max. With the sun now set, a second fly-off was arrange for the following morning.

There were other fly-offs, and one was particularly remarkable. The Slow Open Power fly-off had 7 contenders. Steve Barnes had a beautiful flight of 10:06 and he did not get a podium place. Pete Watson had a wonderful flight of 22:09, but he was not the winner, as Phil Ball’s model flew on for 24:53.

At 8am on Monday morning Chris and Peter lined up for the second fly-off for F1a in very different conditions. It was cool and misty, the cloud base no higher than 100 metres. There was a light drift from the East. In difficult conditions Peter made a very competent 2:46 flight, but Chris did an outstanding flight 4:40 to win the Ronytube Trophy.

3

Chris Edge is right to be well pleased.

Finished 1st in a remarkable F1a contest.

The contests on Monday were scheduled to start at 9am. Chris entered F1h glider; David entered Classic Glider and E36: and Jim entered Classic Rubber and Vintage Glider

( A few months back, when Ron realised that he would not be coming to these Nats, Jim had offered to fly one of his Vintage Gliders on his behalf. He had a wide choice. In good weather the majestic Lunak is unbeatable. In rough weather his Nord2 would be very competitive. Then there is the Oreon which won at the Scots Nats a few years back. Ron thought that the Odenman was the best option to suit most weather conditions )

It should have been a busy day from the start but with the very low cloud base, only a few low flying models were active for the first hour or so. Some test flights were made with higher climbing models which showed the cloud base to be around 75 metres. David had a few test flights with his Pearlite E36 on short motor runs. It was performing well but was very sensitive to the launch angle. His last test flight on a full 10 sec run went into the cloud, but with a short d/t it was readily found again. As the cloud base eased a little higher to over 100 metres, we were able to fly vintage and classic Gliders with their long tow-lines On its first launch, the Odenman was hanging out to the right on tow and Jim had to release at half height for very disappointing 1:23 time. Unfortunately, the auto rudder pin had been pulled out on launch. The second flight was super and showed what the model was capable of. Straight to the top of the line and into a gently supportive patch of air for a comfortable max. With the top two fliers out of reach ahead, that max was enough to secure third space. The Vintage glider event was won by Colin Foster with full house flying a Nord2.

4   5

David had two flights with his classic Sans Egal. They were almost identical – good straight tows to the top of the line and then gently floated off. The Sans Egal was gliding beautifully. Two very nice maxes.

Chris was churning out the maxes with his F1h glider.

And then the rain started. According to the forecast we were expecting one or two short showers, but this continued on and on. It got heavier and got lighter but it would not go off. When the time reached 3pm and it was still raining Jim decided that he would have to start making Classic Rubber flights in the wet. The first flight with his Urchin was a good comfortable max, d/t’ing down just in front of the compound. It was fetched back quickly and then dried of with kitchen roll and set aside for the tissue to shrink tight again.

David found himself in the same position as Jim had been on Saturday, with two maxes on the board and looking for a weather break to give a chance at his third. He gave up thoughts of flying E36 to be ready to use any chance that presented itself. The rain persisted.

Jim sent the Urchin off again, another very smooth climb looked good – but then “oh no”, it was fading into the low cloud at about 100 metres height. It disappeared then reappeared before d/t’ing down safely into the compound. Again it was retrieved quickly and dried off as before. Still the rain persisted.

I spent some time watching Gary Madelin circle towing his F1h. Here was a master at work. F1h’s are so much harder to handle than F1a’s. There were a few great F1a glider fliers flying in F1h and most seem to lose control momentarily from time to time. Not Gary Madelin, the model seemed to be exactly where he wanted it all the time. Only our Chris came close to his standard of circling, and Chris used that skill to clock in the five maxes that he needed to get into the F1h fly-off, along with Gary Madelin and Andy Crisp.

As we came into the final hour of the contest with a light drizzle still falling, Jim and David had to make their third flights. Jim sent the Urchin off again, this time letting the initial burst run off in hand before launching to keep it below the clouds. This worked well, there was still enough performance in neutral air for a comfortable max to reach the classic rubber fly-off. When David took the Sans Egal out for its third flight the clouds were still low at 100 metres, the air was cool and there was a light drizzle. David did everything possible, getting the Sans Egal up to the full line height and releasing it smoothly. It looked promising initially as the model was gliding well, but then it was coming down steadily. In unhelpful air it was back on the ground in 2:10. This put David into 3rd place, behind Colin Foster and Roger Heap who had their three maxes.

The Classic Rubber was a combined event with Classic Power and Jim would fly-off against Steve Barnes, who had qualified flying a Lucky Lindy. As the Urchin wing was not well dried out and still a bit baggy, Jim stopped short of full turns for the fly-off to keep the climb quite sedate. The Urchin climbed away gently but still gained a good height. It d/t’d down for a 2:57 flight. There were no glow motors fired up during the slot and Steve Barnes did not make a flight, leaving Jim as the winner.

In the F1h fly-off, Chris line up with Gary and Andy. Gary started circling straight away. Andy waited on the ground. Chris started to tow then crickey ! A “systems failure ?” as he towed up. The model was dumped back to earth. Chris had a quick look at the bundle on the ground and went scampering off to his car. Andy Crisp then towed up quickly and released. Gary Madelin circled over beside Andy’s model and launched his F1h high, directly above it. My guess is that he thought with Chris grounded all he had to do was beat Andy’s model. However, a minute later, Chris was back in action and hunting for the good air. With the extra adrenalin pumping, Chris made superb launch and the model floated away for a fabulous 4:50 flight, to win by a large margin. All this in the space of the five minute fly-off slot !

It was a double victory, F1a + F1h for Chris. These two wins meant Chris received a third medal as the overall Glider Champion.

6

Medals Galore ! A great weekend for the Scotia Free Flight Team

It was a memorable weekend in many ways The weather threw everything at us. Gales on Saturday afternoon, perfect conditions on Sunday, then mist and rain on Monday. The number of people attending the nats appeared to be holding up judging by the number of cars, and the number of fliers enjoying the good weather on Sunday, but the poor weather on Saturday and Monday caused very low entries on those days. The use of the camp site was noticeably lower. Nice to meet up again with Maurice Doyle and Peter Watt, our Irish friends, and enjoy their company over an Italian evening meal. I did not see much of their flying but Maurice was third in Tailless on Saturday and Peter placed in Mini-Vintage on Monday. For almost everyone on the field , this was their first Nationals with John O’Donnell not being there as either a winning flier or the elder statesman. And of course, for our group the absence of Ron was poignant, especially felt when we drove onto the airfield on the first morning and saw a HYMER motor home sitting there !

Free Flight Newsletter April 2017

                                Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

 

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                          April  2017

 

The Grand Opening Gala of the 2017 outdoor season fizzled out like a damp squib when the first outing of the season on 19th February was abandoned due to poor weather.

The season did however kick off on 5th March with superb weather conditions.  A light southerly breeze and broken sunshine gave excellent conditions for the Allison Trophy contest.   There were four entries representing four different classes in this combined Mini event.  David Hambley flew his E36 electric powered model, George Blair flew his IC powered 1/2A Witchhawk, Chris Edge flew an A/1, and Jim Arnott chose a mini-vintage rubber powered model.

We soon found that the broken sunshine was creating lift and downdrafts in equal measure and that picking a good launch time was essential.  With his circle towing A/1, Chris was able to sample the air before committing and he used this to full advantage to complete his three maxes and win the Allison Trophy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Chris Edge

2:00

2:00

2:00

6:00

2

Jim Arnott

1:48

2:00

2:00

5:48

3

George Blair

1:31

1:50

1:23

4:44

4

David Hambley

0:58

1:13

2:00

4:11

 

As  F1h ( aka A/1 ) was a five flight event in the BMFA area contests,  Chris continued with another two good maxes to book his place in the evening fly-off.  The breeze had swung around to an Easterly and freshened a little as Chris started towing in the 5 minute allotted slot.  The air was initially very poor but improving gradually and Chris continued to circle until the last moments.  He then propelled the model off with great gusto.  Then shockingly a systems failure destroyed the launch and the model bunted inverted before crashing in at 7secs.

Of the BMFA Plugge Trophy events, only Combined Electric held an interest to our group as no-one flies the P30 or F1j classes.  David Hambley and Chris Edge both competed in CE with their E36 models.  The contest director failed to advise them that they were allowed 15 second motor runs until after they had, in their ignorance, completed their flights from 12 second runs.   David had flights of 0:58, 1:13, and 2:18 for a 4:29 total.   Chris had flights of 1:59, 2:18 and a 2:30 max for a 6:47 total.

 

 

Chris Edge relaxing from the tension of high tech glider flying with his E36 - Joulebox 

1One has to admire his stile

 

  

With the main events completed, there was a flurry of catapult glider activity with Tommy McL, Dave Hearn, Jim Arnott, and Chris all having a go. 

 

After a poor first flight, Jim had a couple of maxes, the second of which was particularly memorable. Launched straight into good air it was climbing swiftly for the first two minutes and the little 16” span model was soon a speck in the sky. Jim said his farewells as it disappeared from naked eye view. If you build these things with no d/t then you expect to occasionally lose one.  Dave and Chris continued to watch through binoculars and when it landed after 5 ½ minutes, Jim was most surprised to hear it was still this side of  Weston Farm and he was able to get it back, eventually after a long search.

 2

 

 

On this day Chris was unstoppable and he made an excellent series of catapult glider flights, which included three 1 minute maxes on his way to a 5:40 total for his seven flight total.

It was an excellent first contest day to kick off our season. 

When the BMFA Area results were collated and published, it was clear that Newbigging had the best weather in the UK.  Chris won the F1h event as the only flier to achieve his five maxes. He was two minutes clear of Dave Cox and Richard Jack.    He also won the Combined Electric event , being some 30 secs ahead of Trevor Payne.   David’s score gave him sixth place in CE.  As if that was not enough, Chris finished 2nd in the Catapult Glider event, being just 20 seconds behind Ivan Clark.  A fabulous performance !

      

                  ♫♫♪♪ One day like this a year'd see me right ♫♪♫♪

 

Indoor Contests

The first indoor contest of the year was cancelled on the eve of the event due to the weather forecast.  As forecast, a very heavy snow fall on 23rd February caused a traffic snarl up throughout the central belt. The Living Room Stick event was rearranged for 2nd March.  Our search for a hall with less hazards than Bathgate’s jungle of ceiling ducting and girders had led us to try the sports hall at Bonnybridge Community Education Centre. We shared the hall with the local indoor R/C flying group who were quite bemused by these home built rubber powered planes.  The hall has a wood clad ceiling supported on a few larger girders. There were three entries Urlan Wannop, Roger Paton and Jim Arnott.  We soon found that the perforated girders were perfect for catching little LRS models and any attempt to put on extra turns for a bit of ceiling scrubbing would most probably finish hung in the girders.  Roger’s model caused great amusement with its gyrations at the start, but with perseverance he managed to find a decent trim for flights of 1:30 and 1:35.  Jim had flights of 3:25 and 4:04.  Urlan was always clear favourite.  His lightly built model was slow flying and very stable and flights of 4:16 and 4:43 gave him a comfortable victory.

The Pennyplane contest was held at Bathgate Academy on 12th March.  With these bigger models it is easier to control the climb height and minimise the risk of getting hung up in the girders. If you get it right then your model will be climbing very gently when it reaches the girders and can graze of the underside until the power drops away for the model to descend.   Urlan had the best model and set a high target with a first contest flight of 6:11.  Roger had a standard Kenny Penny, built for the Flitehook kit, and it flew very well.  His best times were 5:20 and 5:31, for a 10:51 total.  Jim managed best flights of 5:34 and 5:44 to be just 27 secs ahead at 11:18 total.  We looked to Urlan to add a second flight to his 6:11 and to take the lead, but he was having all sorts of problems and did not get another good flight. He finished with a 10:04 total. 

Our next indoor duration contest is on 16th April at Bathgate Academy,  11am to 3 pm.   This is for F1L models, the best performing class that we fly, where flights approaching 10 minutes are anticipated.

 

3rd Area Day

On 26th March we gathered at Newbigging for the BMFA 3rd Area events.   It was another excellent  day with a light South-easterly wind of 8 to 10 mph giving a good stretch of moorland before the tree line. The sun shone from dawn to dusk and Spring had arrived.  There was very little in the Plugge Trophy events to interest us apart from CLG/HLG, but this day was an excellent opportunity to see how some of our models were behaving after winter storage. 

John Eland tested his power models and was very satisfied that he seems to have solved the fuel starvation problems which have plagued him as his model accelerate away from hand.

 3

 

 

 

Tommy McLaughlin had a fruitful day.  He managed to get a useful trim on his E36 Joulebox then tried these  two vintage wakefields  - a Korda in the right hand and a Lanzo in the left.  Two similar designs from early 1940’s by the legendary American flyers Dick Korda and Chester Lanzo. 

 4

 

 

 Jim Arnott’s two Urchins were flying very well.  Using the full Classic Rubber allowance of  a 75gms motor they were climbing quickly to around 500 ft. 

A “senior moment” which resulted in an early d/t and 15 secs dropped on one flight, prevented him from maxing out in the BMFA Gamage Cup contest. 

5 

 (photo credit – Dave Hearn )

 

David Hambley flew his E36 model in the F1q event, where it is allowed a 10 sec motor run.  He had mixed fortunes on the way to a 9:59 total for his five flights. 

 6

The model is flying consistently well - now it is “simply” a case of the pilot picking the right air and launching it correctly

 

Lambing Season

The lambing season is now underway at Newbigging and our next contest not be until 14th May, when we get together for the power championship.  

Weston Farm will not however be using the “Our Meadow” for lambing and Carey is quite happy for us to use it for short trimming and test flights  throughout the lambing period.   There will be no problem retrieving from elsewhere South of the meadow, but please avoid going over to Burngrange side of the road.

 

Free Flight Newsletter December 2016

                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

 

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                          December  2016

Due to events being “blown away” during the Autumn, we entered November with four contests are still waiting to be held.  The first opportunity to catch up came on 13th November. The forecast was not good enough to fly more than one event so the Allison Trophy , all-in-mini contest was run.

The day started with a light drizzle and low cloud, but by 11am the conditions were much more pleasant with a light breeze of a few knots from the Southwest.   In anticipation of the breeze freshening through the day, the CD erected the luxury stile at the east end of the moor to give a safe distance from the trees. 

There were five entries with a good variety of models.  David Hambley and Chris Edge flew their E36’s,  Tommy McLaughlan flew F1g, George Blair flew his Witchhawk 1/2A power model, and Jim Arnott flew his Gollywock mini-vintage model.  

George’s Witchhawk was not on good form and he dropped out early.  After a good starting flight of 1:45 with his F1g, Tommy struggled with the multi-function systems and had poor second and third flights. David, Chris and Jim had a very close contest.  After two flights David and Jim were tied on 3:52 and Chris was only 8 seconds behind.  A flight of 1:44 from David, followed by a 1:40 from Chris meant that Jim needed 1:45 to win.  His Gollywock did not disappoint, wound to the limit it whizzed into the sky for its best climb of the day.  It also happened to be in a buoyant patch of air and it was still 100 ft up when it d/t’d at 2:15.

dec1
Jim, on right, receives the Alison Trophy from last years winner David
 

Despite the occasional drizzle, it had been a very good day.   The breeze which had been forecast to freshen quite significantly, never got above 8 mph. The only model to land in the trees was Jim’s final flight.  It had appeared to land short, but when he went looking it was well tucked down amongst some fallen trees on the front edge of the wood.  It would have been very difficult to find without the help of the retrieval beacon.

 

 Finlayson  Plus

The forecast for Sunday 20th November showed a significant low pressure zone closing in on the Britain. Unusually the centre would pass over the Channel and there was a possibility that Newbigging might have quite light wind while the South coast was taking a real battering.   We gave this day a miss, in the hope of better days to come and we were rewarded with an excellent day on Thursday 24th November for our final outing of the season. It was dry all day and just a gentle drift of air from the South. Despite the temperature being just a few degrees above freezing we basked in bright sunshine for most of the day.

The events were the Rubber Championship for the Finlayson Trophy and two postponed area events -  Classic Power/Rubber  and  Classic Glider.  With only four flyers across the three events, the CD decided to pull them together as a single contest, the Finlayson Plus.  Jim Arnott and Tommy McLaughlan were contesting the rubber championship with their Screwtop and Urchin models.  David Hambley was flying his Sans Egal classic glider, and John Eland was flying SLOP power models.

dec2
John’s latest Gloworm had everyone reaching for their dark glasses.

Tommy’s first comp flight with his Urchin was very disappointing, climbing to only half the expected height and down in 2:02.  Too much downthrust was the diagnosis, and with a little adjustment his second and third flights were maxes.

dec3
Jim’s rubber model performed consistently, giving three comfortable maxes to win the Finlayson Trophy.

In such a light breeze we might have expected David to be struggling with a classic glider.  However with a more rearward towhook position and a turn of sprinting speed, quite unseemly for a gentleman in his seventies, he was getting the Sans Egal to the top of the line.  A gentle float off the top of the line was giving very consistent results, and three maxes was an excellent result.

The fly-off between David’s glider and Jim’s rubber model was on paper a mismatch.  Jim was first away with a good climb, the model settled into its glide nicely and eased its way down for an unassisted flight of 4:02.  David girded his loins and once again sprinted off across the meadow.  The Sans Egal was floated off smoothly into its glide, and it was gliding very nicely indeed.  David had found some gently supportive air that was slowing its descent and after two minutes it was clear that this fly-off was going to be very, very close.  The Sans Egal made the most of the air and a flight of 3:56 was truly remarkable in those conditions.  Just a few seconds short of the Goliath moment unfortunately.  

Caley Shield

The Caley Shield inter-club  team event is based on the scores in the Power, Glider and Rubber championship events.  The score of the top club member is taken as the score for that club.  After the Power and Glider events, the Dunfermline Club had an advantage of three minutes, over Paisley.  Their first place in the Rubber Championship ensured that Dunfermline retained the trophy.

 

Free Flight League :  There were 26 events contested this year, and flyers best 8 events count in the league table.  In a somewhat barren season by Bruce Duncan standards, where he won only one event, Bruce still managed to accumulate enough points for third place in the league.  Chris Edge won all the major Glider events this year - F1a and Open at the Nats, the Steel Cup, and the Pan-Am.  He added a few more points with his expansion into E36 contests and finished in second place in the league.  Jim Arnott had a very good season and won the league by winning ten events, which is pure greed.  His wins varied from Catapult, through Power and Rubber to indoor events.

 

2017  Here  We  Come

In the absence of any comments from the Estate Manager, I am assuming the contest calendar that I submitted to him is accepted. Another full season of fun and frolicking on the Newbigging playing fields lies ahead. I hope you are all making best use of this winter building opportunity and that your new creations will grace the skies in the Spring.

 

I plan to make the date at Bathgate for the PennyPlane contest as March 12  and for F1L contest as April 16.  May 7 will be a trimming session.   We hope to have the LRS contest in February at either the Bonnybridge Hall or Lochgelly Town Hall.

 

When I was down at Newbigging recently, gifting some bribes to the locals,  I was pleased to notice that there had been some tree felling in the strip of trees at the east end of the moor. There had not been a lot done but there were some trunks stacked at the end of the wood.   I hope they get back to it and give it a good clearance. 

 

With the gradual depletion in our numbers, I find it necessary to increase the charges again this year. The flying site rental is £250 per annum.  I think a site fee of £30 for the year, or £5 per day, and holding the contest entry fees of £3 will balance the books.   

Free Flight Newsletter October 2016

                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

 

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                          October  2016

Steel  Cup          7th Aug

The planned date of 7th August turned out to be a shocker, with a 25 mph wind gusting to 40 mph, and the Steel Cup event was postponed until the following weekend.  We were rewarded with a very good day.  Although it was generally dull and overcast, there was a short spell of drizzle around lunchtime.  The light breeze of under 10 mph swung around between Northwest and Southwest making the trees at Weston a constant threat.  The max was set at 2:00 mins,  which could be achieved in the length of the meadow,  for the first 4 rounds. The direction of the breeze at the time of the fifth round would determine if we could risk a higher final max.

Jim Arnott and Chris Edge started with comfortable maxes.  David Hambley followed putting his Sijaesque into a nice patch of lift to see it climbing away beautifully.  But then disaster, no d/t and David was scurrying back to his car to set off after it.  We watched as it continued to climb until it disappeared into cloud at about 1000 ft.  Bruce Duncan started with a 1:42 flight from his Junior. 

The whole meadow sweating up gently buoyant air as the day warmed up and in the second round, Chris, Jim and Bruce all maxed comfortably.  In round three Chris’s model was well on its way to another max but at risk of finishing in the Weston trees, so he triggered his radio d/t for a 1:30 time.  After a short spell of light rain, the breeze died away.  Jim mistook this stillness for neutral air and from a good launch he saw his model fall like a brick for a 1:20 time.  Bruce fared little better with a 1:32 flight.

David returned without his model, having followed the tracker signal into Dolphinton some five miles away. He thought that the model was then in cloud overhead, but he had lost the signal shortly after that. He packed up his gear to continue the search further out.

In the fourth round, Chris consolidated his lead with another max. Bruce dropped just 4 secs with a 1:56 flight. Jim dropped another 19secs with a 1:41 flight.  He was clearly scraping the bottom of his barrel of excuses when he declared that he had been “betrayed by a couple of feeding skylarks”.

Going into the final flights Chris had a lead of 20 seconds from Bruce and 29 secs from Jim.  With the breeze still towards the trees at Weston, but perhaps a tad lighter, the max for the fifth round was set at 2:30.  Bruce had a poor flight of 1:21.  Jim chose a nice patch of air and his model held height for a comfortable max.  Now Chris would need a decent flight to win.  It was much better than a decent flight – a high bunting launch into good air, the max was never in doubt and Chris won the Steel Cup.

1 2 3

  Jim                                                              David and Chris                                          Bruce

David did not find his fly-away model on the day and returned to the area a couple of times in the following days without picking up the signal,  He found the locals all very helpful. Indeed, one farmer chauffeured him around and introduced him to other farmers and to the Newlands Centre in Romano Bridge, who then posted a photo of the model on their Facebook.  Eleven days after the contest , David got a call from Noblehouse Farm, about 2 miles NE of Romano Bridge to say that the model had been found.  It had landed in a field of curious cows who had sampled it before deciding it was really inedible. There was considerable damage, but it is repairable. The model must have been in the air for over an hour to drift about 10 miles in that light breeze.

      

Jubilee Quaich  and Caprice Contests        28 Aug

This turned out to be one of those very special days when free flight contest flying lifts your spirits with delight rather than the usual battle against the vagaries of our weather   It was dry all day, warm sunshine, and the breeze, when there was one, never got above 5 mph. 

There were six entries in the Jubilee Quaich, sporting a broad range of models. In this event, the Cd allocates a performance factor to each entry to equalise their chances. Contestants are encouraged to dig out models which they enjoy flying but which are normally not competitive.  The entries were a KK Ajax from Iain Ward, a hot classic power Dixielander from George Blair, the Classic Sans Egal glider from Bruce Duncan, Tommy McLaughlin’s Vintage Wakefield “The Horry”, David Hambley’s E36 power model,  and  the 80” span vintage power Playboy Senior, built by Ian Granger and flown by Jim Arnott.  In this contest, the max progresses from an easy starter to a testing final flight. 

4 5

Vintage Wakefield – “The Horry”                                          OS35 powered Playboy Senior

The gentle breeze there was swinging to all points of the compass, but generally returning to an easterly drift. In the pleasant conditions, all the entries eventually worked their way into the fly-off.  It was pity that Tommy could not stay for the fly-off, as some of his qualifying flights with the Horry showed that he would have been a real contender.

6 7

KK Ajax                                                                     OS19 powered Dixielander

As the other five flyers prepared for the fly-off, the drift swung to a Southwest and we were now at the wrong end of the meadow.  Guidance from the CD said that we should fly from the moor side of the road and let the drift take the models up towards North Deanhead Farm, and he lead the way with the OS35 powered Playboy.  A nice climb and it settled into buoyant supportive air and circled very sedately over the strip of woodland at the edge of the moor.  It was difficult to imagine how the Playboy could avoid landing in those trees, but it held height well and was carried out over the clover silage field beyond.  It d/t’d from 50ft for a score of 6:03.  Iain’s Ajax produced a very good flight of 41 seconds which with it’s generous factor of five gave him score of 3:25. David’s SuperPearl E36 had a good flight without hitting decent air for a score of 3:06.   Bruce charged across the meadow as fast as he could to get the Sans Egal to the top of the line in the calm conditions.  He was not rewarded with good air, and the model came down steadily for a score of 2:47. The climb of George’s OS19 powered Dixielander was spectacular and it pull out into a patch of buoyant air. Just as we all thought “that’s the winning flight”, up popped the d/t and the model was back on the ground for a score of 5:45, leaving the Playboy as the winner.

The Caprice Contest, for the Bob Grieve Trophy, was also held on this day. The contestants would have appreciated a little more breeze.  Our sprinting ability seems to be tapering off a little and getting models aloft in the flat calm was very difficult.  Jim Arnott’s Caprice is a lightly built example and this gave him an advantage.  Two maxes and a 1:08 took him clear of David Hambley and David Hearn.

 

The next two dates on our calendar, 11th September for the Allison Trophy and the 25th September for the Finlayson Trophy,  were blown OFF with the wind gusting to over 30 mph on both dates.  The next meeting was on 16th October for the Pan-Am trophy and this turned out to be another blustery day. A look at the weather for the coming week showed Thursday the 20th was very promising and a quick exchange of emails found that the troops were keen to go then.

The Pan-Am Trophy  - Glider championship – Thursday 20th October

Unexpected light rain lasted till around 11am then cleared to leave the forecast excellent dry and calm conditions.  The skies were overcast all day and the air was generally quite neutral with only occasional patches of buoyant air which would reduce the sink speed of models.  I do not recall seeing a model rising in lift. 

There were four entries in the glider.  It was quickly obvious that we had the same issue as the Caprice contest where it was too calm and we could not run fast enough to tow models up.  Chris Edge was okay.  Modern F1a’s have a relatively slow glide speed and go up easier on tow, especially when like Chris’s they are designed to give extra decalage during the straight tow and circling stages.  

David Hambley had chosen to compete with his Sans Egal, which has a lighter wing loading than his normal Old Peculiar but even so he had to release well short of full height.  Tommy McLaughlin had one flight with his Sija before throwing in the towel.  Jim Arnott chose to fly his big open glider, Jester.  His first attempts were hopeless and resulted in a zero score for his first flight. He then realised that the model was significantly under-elevated. After packing up the tailplane, the second flight was better.  Another bit of trimming and he finished with an enjoyable max from ¾ line height.  ( Performance hint – trim your model before you do your comp flights.) 

Chris won the Pan-Am Trophy comfortably, achieving three maxes with a margin to spare, as all his flights cleared 3:00.    

 8  Nicely  Judged !

Sans Egal d/t’d down “safely”  - clear of the fence, the telephone wires, the road, and the cars.

The Slow Open Power event, postponed at the weekend was also held on Thursday 20th.  There were five entries.  No problems with it being too calm here.  These conditions were perfect.  Tommy McLaughlin flew his game little Mini-Geef, powered by a Paw100.   It was climbing to good height, but was under-elevated on the glide on the first flight, then a badly set d/t spoilt a certain max on another flight.  Tommy finished with a 6:14 total.  Jim Arnott flew his OS15 powered Dixielander through to a 6:23 total.  George Blair’s Os19 powered Creep was on excellent trim and only a pilot error was going to keep it out of the fly-off.  George provided that with a wrongly set the d/t on the second flight to finish with  6:56 total.     Allan Brown completed his three maxes with his fast moving K&B powered SlowQuell.  He was joined later in the day by John Eland completing his three maxes with his K&B20 powered model.

 9

Having qualified for the fly-off with his Slowquell, which is seen resting behind
Allan played with this Paw100 powered Halifax  Javelin, a very attractive
vintage power design by Arthur Collinson.

An engine cut-off failure saw it climbing into the stratosphere on a full tank.
The fuse d/t brought it back down safely and it landed only 300 yards away.

There was a definite chill in the air as Allan and John lined up for the fly-off.                                                                                 

10 

Allan was first away.  The Slowquell hurtled into the sky, but it went shallow on the second half of the climb.
Then a poor transition lost most of the climb height, which resulted in a very disappointing flight of 2:05.

John’s climb looked sedate by comparison but it was a very effective pattern and rolled out nicely into its glide at about 400 ft.
The air was not helpful and the model glided down steadily for a winning time of 2:55.

  

Caley Shield

The Caley Shield inter-club  team event is based on the scores in the Power, Glider and Rubber championship events.  The score of the top club member is taken as the score for that club.  The Power and Glider events are now completed and the Rubber championship has still to come.

 

The team positions are

 

POWER

GLIDER

 

Dunfermline

7:26

4.35

 

Paisley

7:26

1:34

 

Edinburgh

-

-

 

 

 World Championship 2017

Congratulations to Chris Edge.  He is in the GB’s  F1a Team again.   Alongside John Carter and John Williams, he will represent GB at the 2017 World Championships to be held in Hungary from August 6-13th 2017. That looks like a very strong and experienced team – good luck to them.

The Jacobite Trophy

The opportunity to add time to your Jacobite Trophy log finished on 16th October.   Bruce Duncan was the run-away winner with a total of 83 minutes.  He accumulated 24 minutes in one day, when he did three 6 minute flights alongside a five minute flight and 1 minute flight. That was more than his opponents achieved in the season, with Jim and Davis way back on 18 minutes and 13 minutes respectively.  Himself, the Thane of Glaur, will be returning to his Perth residence.   

The   Chuck Glider/ Catapult Glider Trophy

Bill’s Chuckie League has been poorly supported this year.   Jim was the only regular competitor and was unbeaten, that is apart from the day when he gave Chris a shot of his “good” model.

Comps

1

2

3

4

5

Total

Jim Arnott

7

10

10

5

7

39

Bill Shanks

5

 

 

 

 

5

David Hearn

 

7

 

 

5

12

John Eland

 

5

 

 

 

5

Tommy McL

 

 

7

 

 

7

Bruce Duncan

 

 

5

 

 

5

Chris Edge

 

 

 

 

10

10

Coming Shortly

The postponed Allison and Finlayson events will be happening soon on an impromptu good weather day.

There is an indoor trimming session at Bathgate on 18th December at the usual time of 11 am to 3 pm.  Urlan has booked Bathgate for March 12, April 16, and May 7  2017 as the dates for our  LRS, NPP, and F1L contests, although we may revise the LRS to a small hall with a solid ceiling – especially after Roger lost a very nice “Bob Romash Poonker” above the ducting at Bathgate last time out.

The BMFA have published a 2017 contest calendar, so I will get our programme out soon.

 

Free Flight League :  There are four events still to come, which are Finlayson Trophy ( combined Rubber ); Classic Glider; and Classic R/P from 7th area; and the Allison Trophy  ( all in Mini ).  The present league table is attached.  

 

Free Flight Newsletter August 2016

 

                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

 

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                          August  2016

 

Cranfield  Classic   12th June

The long period of high pressure over the UK and settled weather that we enjoyed in early June started to break down as a low pressure zone squeezed in from the west. The forecast for the Cranfield Classic was an easterly breeze of 8/10 mph gusting to 15 mph during the morning and calming down through the afternoon to average 5/6 mph.  There was a high probability of rain.  It might be unpleasant for flyers perhaps, but this should have little effect on Cranfield power models.  The day dawned as a miserable dreich morning with drizzle rolling in from the North Sea on a blustery wind, the CD showed great faith in online weather forecasting by declaring that the meeting was on.  By 10:30 the rain dried up and the easterly breeze started to ease off.  It was still brisk enough to carry models into the woods in two and a half minutes, so a 2 min max was set.

There were only three entries.  Tommy McLaughlin flew his OS15 powered Lucky Lindy, Jim Arnott flew his OS15 powered La Bestia, and Iain Ward flew his AM25 powered Mister Max.  Jim started sharply and soon had two maxes on the scoreboard, with his La Bestia looking on good trim. Tommy started with max on his first flight.  As the Mister Max had not flown for a few years, Iain had a couple of trimming flight to get it performing.  His first comp flight had a good pattern, if sedate, climb and settled into a nice glide.  It would have been close to a max, but very unluckily it hit a telegraph wire a crashed heavily onto the road.  Jim’s third flight saw another good climb but it was in very poor air and came down quickly for a disappointing 1:41 time.  Tommy’s second flight was similarly in poor air and down in 1:46.   A third flight over 1:54 could still win it for Tommy.  The Lucky Lindy climbed nicely and flipped out into the glide very well, but it was again a patch of very poor air and it was pulled down very quickly for 1:25.    

12

Jim Arnott with  LaBestia                                                   Tommy McLaughlin with Lucky Lindy

 

After putting the damaged Mister Max away, Iain thought he would try his luck with his second model, a  Silver Swallow powered La Bestia.  His luck was really poor, after a big loop the model hurtled into the trees. The engine cut just before the model hit a tree trunk plumb centre and the shattered wings spewed out on either side. 

When asked if it was repairable, he mused that once he gets the covering off he will see if he is able to do anything with it.    ( did I hear someone say a bit like a woman, then )

3

😢 ♫♫♪♪ Many a tear has to fall,  but it’s all in the game ♫♪♫♪ 

        

Scottish  Nationals   25/ 26 June

The weather on Saturday was very good - a light breeze of some 8 mph and dry all day.  The max was set at 2:30 for the three F1a, Vintage and SLOP contests that were planned for the day. The breeze was generally from the North carrying models into clear ground but it occasionally swung to the Northeast putting models at risk from the trees.

With a few of our regulars unavailable, the number of entries were low with 3 in F1a, 3 in SLOP, and 4 in Vintage.

In F1a, Tommy McLaughlin looked to be on his way to his first max but his Sija drifted into the trees at 2:21 and hung up in the upper branches and refused to be prodded with the poles.  Bruce had two maxes and a 1:23 flight with his Sans Egal for a 6:23 total.  Chris Edge won the event.  Relaxed circle towing in the smooth air conditions allowed him to find buoyant air for three comfortable maxes.

In the Vintage event.  There were three power entries and one glider.  Allan Brown flew an Elfin 249 powered Mallard, Tommy McLaughlin flew a Fox 25 powered San De Hogan, Jim Arnott flew a OS15 powered All American, and Bruce Duncan flew his Leprechaun glider.    

4

Bruce’s Leprechaun was stalling badly on trimming flights and needed a bit of fine adjustment to the cg position.

The delicate attachment of a lump of scrap steel from an old van door-lock cured the problem nicely and the Leprechaun’s first round max was then majestic. 

Tommy and Allan both dropped time on their first flights.

Jim’s All American maxed the first flight despite having lost its glide turn. 

In the second round Bruce and Jim maxed again, while Allan’s Mallard dropped short again.  Tommy’s San De Hogan had a disaster when a few seconds into the climb the model went crazy and crashed in heavily.  The assembled audience concluded that the tailplane had jumped its seating and gone vertical.  On the final flight Bruce launched into poor air and the Leprechaun was down in 2:13. 

 

Jim’s All American produced it best flight of the day to win the McManus Trophy with a full house of three maxes.

 5

In the Slow Open Power event, there were three entries.  Allan Brown was flying his potent K&B powered SlowQuell. He was having problems with his engine cut-off and suffered an overrun on his first attempt, then had a very disappointing 1:08 at the second attempt. His second flight was 1:40 before getting it sorted for a final comfortable max.  Jim Arnott, flying his OS15 powered Dixielander started with a max but his second flight was poor at 1:23.

Mike Quinn flew this Fora21d powered Soupa Zeus.

6

Spectacular climbs and a nice floaty glide gave him comfortable maxes on the first two flights.  This gave Mike the luxury of being able to d/t his third flight early for a comprehensive win.

 

On Sunday, the wind had freshened to about 12 mph and moved round to be from West.  With only a short distance downwind in this direction, about 2 minutes flying time, we would have to limit the max to avoid trees and the horse paddocks at Weston Farm.  A 1:30 max was prescribed and the d/t descent time on each flight would be accumulated to decide the winners.  It was dry for most of the day.  By the time the rain came around 3 pm, only the final flights were effected.

 

In the Rubber event, Tommy McLaughlin’s Urchin was on excellent form and handled the turbulent conditions well to get three maxes and accumulate 64 secs of d/t descent time to win the Waulkmill Trophy.

Jim Arnott and Bruce Duncan were unable to match this consistency and finished second and third respectively.

 

 

“ Crivvens, I’m fair peched oot”

 

 

aug8

In Power, Allan Brown’s  KSBs40 powered Trickstar 700 was not on perfect trim but it was still more than a match for Jim Arnott’s OS15 power Dixielander. 

Allan won the Flying Dutchman Trophy with three maxes and 41 secs d/t time against Jim’s 7 secs d/t time.

 

 aug9

With the unpredictable turbulence coming across the upwind trees, there was little refinement in Glider towing today.  It was a case of up and be grateful to get it off safely. 

The two young ones fought out a close battle of modern versus classic. 

Three maxes and 17 secs d/t time with his modern F1a gave Chris Edge a 6 second lead over Bruce Duncan’s Classic Sans Egal. 

Chris won the Ian Granger Trophy.

 

Despite the adverse wind direction and the wet finish to the day, it had been an enjoyable day and we managed to have meaningful contests.  

 

Mid-Summer has passed  so  Urlan has started making plans for the Autumn/Winter Indoor Programme.

The Bathgate hall has been booked for three trimming dates  :-

18 September

30 October

18 December                 all at the usual 11am to 3pm slots

 

Paisley Trophy  Contest         24th  July

As recent unsettled weather continued, it was a marginal and late decision to go ahead with the Paisley Trophy event.  The forecast was for a light Southerly breeze, which is a very good direction for us.  It seemed certain that we would be hit by rain at some point, just a case of when and how heavy.

There were four entries in the Paisley Trophy Contest.  Allan Brown flew a Veco 19 powered Lucky Lindy,  David Hambley flew his Super Pearl as an Open Electric, Jim Arnott flew his OS15 powered All American, and Tommy McLaughlin flew his OS25 powered San De Hogan.

Having tested his model successfully on Wednesday, Allan Brown was straight into an early comp flight.  He was disappointed to see the model rolling too much on the climb.  From a poor climb the Lucky Lindy did very well to achieve a 2:19 time.  Jim’s All American was a little too tight on the climb and did not reach its expected height.  It was also in very poor air and dropped down below the max at 2:24.

David Hambley’s SuperPearl showed a textbook pattern climb and settled into a nice glide for a comfortable first max.

After a slight adjustment Allan was off again,  This time the climb was sparkling and the model pulled out high up,  It was still at a good height when it d/t and 10 secs later landed.  We were shocked to read 2:25 on the stopwatch – he had d/t’d early.    Jim and David both maxed their second flights with good flights. 

There had been a couple of light showers of rain already, but now the clouds opened for a real downpour which lasted about 30 mins. 

Tommy had been trimming his much repaired San de Hogan and it was starting to look very promising.  In fact, it was going so well that Tommy decided that it was too good. If he competed with it, he would be physically unable to retrieve three big flights. 

He put it away and made a “token” flight with his Mini-Geef.

aug10 

Tommy’s Classic GEEF’s  - OS15 in the full size version and PAW100 in mini.

 

 So it came down to the final flights.   David was in poll position with two maxes and was leading by 6 secs from Jim, with Allan a further 10 secs behind.  David was away first as the rain eased off.   The climb was a good pattern but well short of the SuperPearl’s norm climb height.  It then started stalling on the glide, possibly due to the weight of rainwater on the tailplane.  The result was a very disappointing flight of 1:46 – and an open door for his challengers.  Allan’s Lucky Lindy  followed with a very high climb into buoyant air for a solid max.  Jim’s All American climbed high but it was clearly under-elevated on the glided and came down quickly.  It scraped over the max by a few seconds to win the Paisley Trophy.

Chris Edge flew in the BMFA area event for F1a.   Three maxes, a 2:21 and a 204 flight gave him an 11:55 total. 



Free Flight Newsletter June 2016



                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

 

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                                    June 2016

Indoor Flying

The PennyPlane contest was held at Bathgate Academy on 27th March.  There were four entries.  Roger Paton was shown a few trimming tricks of the trade to get his new model going and he was well pleased to get it up amongst the girders and to get a flight of 2:55 from it.  Bruce Duncan did not come near his best form and had to settle for flights of 5:08 and 5:13. Urlan Wannop and Jim Arnott were again vying for the top spot and although Urlan had the best time of the day with a 6:12, it was Jim who had the better two flight total with 5:39 and 6:02, winning by 14secs.

We were back at Bathgate on 24th April for the F1L contest.  This is the best performing class that we fly. The Scottish record for the class is 10:47 , by Aubrey Beaton in March 2000 at Lochgelly High School.  It is a simple model of 18” span and 3” chord, with a minimum weight of 1.2g.  Building a model in the 1.5 to 1.6g range is quite easy but getting down to 1.2 without it being too flimsy is very difficult.  For the first two hours of our session, the air in the hall was poor and I had increase the thickness ( and therefore weight  ) of my motors to get a good climb. A model which will regularly clock eight and a half to nine minutes was returning about seven minutes. In the second half of the day the air warmed up and we were able to get better times.  Roger with his first F1L managed a very encouraging flight of 5:40.   Bruce had flights of 5:45 and 6:20.  Urlan had a few hang ups on the girders and suffered model damage. He finished with best flights of 8:10 and 8:35.   Jim Arnott eventually got his models going and had flights of 9:20 and 9:32 to win.  

This margin of victory was enough to give Jim the best total over the three indoor contests and to retain the Aubrey Memorial Trophy.         

Lawrie Trophy Meeting     15th May

After the extended break due to lambing, we were grateful to have a perfect weather day for our return to Newbigging on 15th May. It was a pleasantly warm day with very little breeze. At the start of the day, the direction of the drift was indeterminate, varying from Northwest to Southwest. As the day progressed Northwest to North became settled. The main event was Power Championship for the Lawrie Trophy. There were five entries in this combined power event where classic, vintage, SLOP, Open Electric, and Bmfa Power could all compete.  Tommy McLaughlin flew his classic Geef – an early d/t on the first flight spoilt his chances and he finished with a 6:01 total.  David Hambley and Chris Edge, in his first power contest, flew E36’s of a 12 sec motor run.  Both had a single max and two dropped flights.  David finished on 4:34 and Chris finished with 5:54.  Jim Arnott flew his vintage OS15 powered All American, now repaired after a high speed encounter with a fence last time out.  He was still fighting with an inconsistent trim.  The first flight was 2:26 in poor air after a good climb.  The second and third flights were big maxes in good air but the model had no consistent glide turn, wander all over the county – generally to the right but with occasional swoops to the left.  John Eland flew his BMFA power model and started with two nice maxes.  John needed 2:27 to win on his final flight – what did he get? 2:26 of course, for a tie and making a fly-off necessary. 

1

John Eland and Jim Arnott prepare for the Lawrie Trophy fly-off 

 

In the fly-off John launched first – a nice climb pattern and the model pulled out into buoyant air.  Jim followed immediately, but his model tightened to the right and spent 12 secs hammering around at 150ft height. It then stalled down for 1:12. Meanwhile John’s model held height for three minutes, then eased down for a terrific 5:16 time to win the Lawrie Trophy.  In the Area event,  there were 19 entries in Combined Power and 8 made the fly-off, John and Jim were 9th equal.  Ray Vaughn won the event with a 3:45 fly-off time.

In the other events, Bruce Duncan won the Vintage power/Rubber event with his game little Bazooka which is looking much better with a greatly shortened motor length.  Chris Edge flew in the Bmfa combined Glider event but had a couple of poor launches, by his standard, on his way to a 6:33 total.

2

Bruce waits for signs of lift for his Bazooka

 

The British Nationals

This year four members set off for the annual jamboree at Barkston Heath over the Whitsun weekend.  The roads South were even more congested than usual, but David Hambley and Jim Arnott arrived in time to set up camp and take advantage of a calm evening for some trimming flights. David made good progress with his E36, getting it on a nice trim. His good work was then wiped away when a heavy d/t landing on a runway knocked off the motor. Jim enjoyed better fortune finding that his large open glider and his All American were both performing very well.

Saturday morning arrived with a light breeze of about 10 mph from the Northeast.  It was dry all day.  As the heat built up it was clear that there were big thermal and equally big downdrafts.  You were either in lift or you were sub-max.  Having been out early readjusting his E36, David was happy that he had it ready for the contest.  The new 2016 rules for E36 have reduced the motor run for flights one and two from 15 secs to 10 secs, making all three qualifying flights now 10 secs, followed by a miserly 5 secs motor run in the fly-off.  With the 10 secs run, you need to find non-sinking air to get a max, and David did not.  He dropped time on the first two flights.  A solid max on the third flight was little consolation.  After a disastrous first flight in Bmfa Glider, Chris Edge turned his attention to E36 and managed the three maxes to book a place in the fly-off.  John Eland had entered the Bmfa Power but he had a really traumatic morning crashing models and he retired to take Irene shopping.  Perhaps he managed to max out his flexible friend with some retail therapy. Jim started his day with his Screwtop in Bmfa Rubber.  The first flight was whopper. A spritely climb in a big thermal took the model to about 1000ft when the d/t went. Then the concern really grew as it was not coming down. Eventually it shook loose of the thermal and he was very relieved to see it drop short of the trees on the Belton road at 5 ½ mins.  The second flight was a similar comfortable max, not quite so high and this time dropping out of the lift more swiftly.  The third flight climbed away enthusiastically in good air and after a minute, you would have bet your shirt on a sure max, but then it started dropping with the prop still turning. It had slipped out of the good air into a vicious downdraft and it was back on the ground at 2.13. Judging by his language, Jim was a little upset.   David and Jim then turned to their second event, Bmfa Glider.  David with his “Old Peculiar” chose the air well to score  three nice maxes and to qualify for the fly-off, as he did last year.  Jim had another event where two big maxes were followed by a downer.

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David was again in the glider fly-off with his “Old Peculiar”

There were 12 in the Glider fly-off.  David had a poor launch with the model coming off at speed to the right and taking a while to recover.  His time of 2:01 left him in 11th place.  The first and second places went to Jack’s, Richard beating dad Alan’s superb 8:53 flight with an even better 9:19.

There were six in the E36 fly-off.   Chris’s appeared to launch little too straight and the 5 sec motor run was not enough time for the model to get settled into its normal climb pattern.  It stalled as the motor cut and took a while to settle. A 1:05 score left Chris in 4th place, while the winner was just 19 seconds ahead.  A good launch would have won it !

On Sunday the breeze had swung to be from the North and it had increased to about 12/14 mph.  We were flying from compound down the length of a runway towards the hanger, about ¾ mile away, with the campsite and the pig farm beyond. The max in all events was set to two minutes, in an attempt to keep models on the field. The rounds were about 90 mins long, which made it a fairly leisurely event.  At the start of the day the air was cool and lift was difficult to find.  In round one, David had a line cross when towing which caused his model to release early and he dropped time with a 1:46.  Chris had poor launch and also missed the max. Jim just scrapped over the max. In round 2 we all maxed comfortably.  In round 3 it was Jim who had towline problems – after he had released his model, his line floated over another flyer’s line.  That flyer carried on circling and dancing on the line until he had knitted it into a birdsnest. Jim gathered the up the bundle and ran around with the flier until he eventually released his model.   Jim did not see anything of his flight and was pleased to hear it had been a big max, which was eventually tracked to the middle of the campsite.  David dropped further time in round four with a poor launch then had a very satisfactory comfortable max on his last round. He finished in 13th place.  Chris maxed the final rounds, including the breezy final round where he gave the model the full welly producing a spectular launch, which must have cleared 100 metres and was the best I saw all day.  The air was poor but it could not pull such a high model down in less than two minutes. Chris is shown in the official results with a 7:27 total, but I am sure his final max has not been included.  A 9:27 total would have placed him 9th.  Jim continue to max the five rounds and booked his place in a 6 way fly-off.  At 7pm, with air steadily cooling, Jim lined up alongside 5 circling super bunters.  His launch was a very poor uncommitted flop of the top, which got what it deserved – a time of 1:32 and 5th place.  John Cooper and John Carter, circling downwind of the line, found some better air and did flights of 7:15 and 5:38 for first and second places.

Monday was very windy all day, with a 20 mph average gusting to over 30mph . The majority of people decided to keep their models safely in their boxes.   Chris flew F1h. I did not see any of Chris’s flights but his 8:30 total left him just out of the podium positions again in 4th place.

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 Jim flew this Gollywock in Mini-vintage.  This was the most popular class on the day but even here only 15 of the 59 entries chanced their luck.  Jim started with a disappointing flight of 1:30 - probably did not wind it hard enough – which travelled nearly the full length of the airfield. He followed up with two big maxes which were in the air for 3 mins and finished two fields out of the park.  He took 2 hours to retrieve each of them and was totally cream-crackered.  Jim finished in 5th spot.  

So at the end of another very enjoyable British Nats, we headed home empty handed but not despondent.  The main lesson I learnt was that I need to pull my belt in – you cannot sprint with an F1a and hold your trousers up at the same time !

Free Flight Newsletter March 2016



                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

 

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                          March 2016

Indoor Flying

We had a trimming session late last year at Bathgate Academy, then the first contest of the season was for “Living Room Stick” models on 21st February.  These tiny models are perhaps the most challenging to get to perform.  The rules specify a 7” maximum wing span and a 6” diameter prop.  The minimum weight allowed is 0.43 gms, but if you can build anything below 0.6gms you are doing very well.  The torque from the large prop makes trimming difficult but you must have that large prop to achieve a decent duration. The power is provided by a strip of rubber about 40 thou by 25 thou.   LRS models have been lost amongst the open girders in the roof of Bathgate Academy so we hired a smaller hall with a ceiling roof for our contest.  This was at Lochgelly Town Hall, which has a floor space of some 35 ft by 50ft and a ceiling at 18ft.

1  2

Crikey, there are big moths in here !
A typical contest flight would climb to the hit the ceiling around 45 secs, 
Urlan watches his LRS model climb away, cruise around for two minutes bumping off the roof, then slowly descend . as the power runs out.

The lead changed hands between Urlan Wannop and Jim Arnott a few times during the day as they returned flights around the 4 minute level. Urlan won by five seconds with best flights of  4:02 and 3:59, against Jims best of 4:01 and 3:55.   Roger Paton flew a ready to fly Butterfly model which did well to clear a minute with its plastic prop.  He also had some good flights from a Bulldog Pennyplane, a kit which also comes with a plastic prop.  It scared the life out of the other flyers, emulating a flying threshing mill.  Bruce Duncan was trimming a new EZB model. A flight of over six minutes was very impressive in such a small hall and he will be keen to see what it can do at Bathgate.

Our next contest is at Bathgate Academy on 27th March,  11am to 3pm.  It is the Novice Pennyplane Contest.  This class is much easier to build and fly.  It is chunkie model with an 18” by 5” wing and a minimum weight of 3.1gm ( which was the weight of the US cent, “penny”).  You can build one down to that weight with normal hobby shop selected wood.  The prop is a 12” max.  At Bathgate average flights are around 5 minutes.  Our best recorded NPP flight is a 7:35 by Bruce Duncan, in 2014.   If you want to try your hand at indoor rubber duration  flying, there will be some spare Pennyplanes available on the 27th for you to play with.

3   Attempting the impossible – an “elegant” Pennyplane

 

First Outdoor event

Our planned meeting on 14th February was abandoned due to a gusty north wind and sub-zero temperature, however the weather forecast for the second BMFA Area events on 6th March was very good and we emerged from hibernation then.

At the start of the day the weather was spectacularly good with almost no drift and pleasant weak sunshine. It felt like Spring had arrived.  By the time we started flying, a light breeze of 5 mph from the North developed.  This freshened to 10 mph by 1pm but the conditions remained very good.

The BMFA area events were P30, F1j, and CE.  Only David Hambley had an interest in one of these events, the combined electric with his E36 models.  The rest of us enjoyed the rare opportunity of trimming models.

David made a couple of Jacobite flights to check that his E36 SuperPearl had come out of winter storage okay.  The model was in good trim so he started his flights in Combined Electric.  With the 15 secs motor run allowance, the SuperPearl was quite capable of getting the 2:30 maxes unaided given a good launch.  Unfortunately David launched the model too straight on his first flight and the resulting off-pattern climb saw the model finish well below its normal climb height.  A very disappointing time of 1:37 was the outcome.  The next two flights were perfect climbs into buoyant air for two comfortable maxes, of course, to compound the frustration. Across the UK, there were nine entries in Combined Electric and with good conditions everywhere, five made it to the fly-off.  Pete Watson from Birmingham won with a 6:40 flight.

Tommy McLaughlin was  trimming his Horry, a vintage 8oz wakefield.  After a few minor adjustments it showed its contest winning heritage with a spritely climb, a nice glide, and a d/t down from 200ft after 1:30. 

 

4 5

 John Eland was trimming some of his power models.  Problems with the pressure feed system on the new one prevented seeing its full potential.

Jim Arnott had an eventful yin-yang day.  First task was trimming his OS15 powered All American vintage power model.  A nice pattern first climb on a short 7 sec motor run and a decent glide was very satisfactory. It is an UP.  On returning to the car with the model, Jim noticed that the cover of the bug-box was away and his retrieval bug was missing.  Senior moment – when he put the bug in the model, he had thrown away the old securing band with intention of putting on a new band, but he never did put the new band on !  The bug could be anywhere in 80 metre by 300 metre area of moorland. It is a DOWN. When the tracker was switched on, it gave a very good signal at the car area so the initial search was there.  However moving away from the cars showed an even better signal from the model launch area.  As Jim started searching that area, Tommy came over to help.

 6   

A few moments later Tommy had incredibly spotted the needle in the haystack.   It is an UP.  It was a remarkable of reversals of roles from a few years ago when at Middle Wallop, Jim had similarly found Tommy’s lost bug.

With the bug safely secured in the All American, Jim went on to try a full length motor run.  This time the model started tightening to the right, then spiralled in a high speed to wrap itself around a roadside fence.  It is a DOWN. Questions have to be asked about who was responsible for allowing him out without a carer.

Next out was Jim’s OS15 Powered Dixielander.  A test flight on a 6 sec run showed a sprightly climb, over rolling a little.  The model was d/t’d 2 secs after the motor run.  A slither of right rudder and it was on to a full 12 secs run.   The climb was super and the model pulled out nicely at about 500 ft.  It is an UP.  The d/t, set for 1 minute, did not happen and the model was heading for the woods.  It was joined by a couple of buzzards who also fancied the buoyant patch of air.  It is a DOWN 

7 Jim’s    OS15  powered  Dixielander

After some five minutes, the patch of good air decayed, the buzzards flew off, and the Dixielander then descended, overflying the dense woods and landing in open fields beyond.  Nice to finish on an UP.

Bruce Duncan trimmed a couple of F1a Gliders.  First his W-hobby’s Junior was on good trim and twice went off for flights around 3 mins. Then Bruce tried a model that had been built by Tony Brown of the Tynemouth Club many years ago. It towed a little to the right but when released, the glide was excellent.  A useful addition to Bruce’s fleet for when the wind is light.

John Eland and David Hearn had a little “sampler” session with Jim’s catapult gliders.  David had a best flight of 20 sec without really giving it full power. John got 17secs, which is not bad for a left hander trying to launch a right/left trimmed model.

By 3pm the temperature had dropped and a flurry of snow reminded us that it was still early March.  We had enjoyed the best of the day and were happy to pack up and head home.   

Free Flight Newsletter November 2015



                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

 

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                          November  2015

 

 

The End of Season Round Up

 

The Allison Trophy contest was held as planned on 27th September.  This is an All-in-Mini event with A/1 and Coupe models getting their times multiplied by a factor of 1.2 which allows them to compete on a fairly even footing with Mini-Vintage, ½ A Power ( 8secs run) , and E36 ( 12 secs run ) models.  The conditions were good with a 10 mph breeze from the Southwest.  From the Southwest corner of the meadow, it was possible to fly the 2:00 maxes without reaching the trees.  It remained dry but chilly all day. 

There were five entries with a wide-ranging mixture of models.  Tommy McLaughlin and Bruce Duncan flew Coupe, George Blair flew ½ A power, David Hambley flew E36, and Jim Arnott flew a mini-vintage rubber model.

George found that his usually reliable Witchhawk was well off trim and retired after the first disappointing flight.  Tommy struggled with his very potent multi-function Coupe and returned three flights with a total of 2:32.  Bruce’s low tech approach to Coupe was working well but his first two flights were in poor air and landed short of the max.  His third flight was a comfortable max giving a total of 5:39.  Jim’s Gollywock was climbing high all day, but on two of his flights it came down quickly in poor air and he finished with a 5:48 total.  After initial tests with his new E36, David reverted to his well proven Super Pearl E36 and completed three textbook max flights for the winning 6:00 total.

 

brucecoupetommycoupe

Bruce’s coupe performed well in the Allison Trophy                          Tommy’s  Multifunction Coupe

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Our last outdoor meeting of the season was on the 18th October.  A prolonged period of settled weather continued, giving us excellent conditions for this final day.  For most of the day the breeze was around 8 mph.  It started from the East, making a 2:30 flight at risk of reaching the Firpark trees but after an hour the breeze swung to the South East which gave generous space for max flights.   There was a busy schedule of events with the planned Glider Championship and Slow Open Power events and the postponed Caprice Glider event. 

In the Glider Championship for the Pan-Am Trophy, there were four entries. In the first flights Jim Arnott’s big Open Glider was down in 1:39 after an uncharacteristic under-elevated and tight circling flight.  Bruce Duncan’s Sans Egal recorded a flight of 2:03.  David Hambley, flying his Old Peculiar, and Tommy McLaughlin, flying his Sija, both had very nice max flights.  On the second flights things got much worse for Jim.  Despite adding a little tail packing, his model was so under-elevated that he could not tow it up and when released it made a very fast descent for 0:37.  Bruce had second flight of 2:18.  David had an early d/t to lose a certain max for a 2:17 time.  Tommy gave himself a 10 second lead with another fine flight of 2:27.  For the final flight  Jim managed to get his model back to a decent trim and d/t’d early for a 2:14 time.  Bruce kept himself very well in contention with a very nice max flight for a 6:51 total.   David then also maxed to set a new lead time of 7:17.  Tommy needed a flight of over 2:20 to win.  Tommy towed as fast as his little legs could carry him but in the light breeze he could not get the model fully to the top of the line.  The Sija was gliding very well but it eased its way down for a 2:08 flight.  David had won the Pan-Am Trophy.

In the Slow Open Power event there were two entries,  George Blair and John Eland.  John had his new K&B Sportsman powered model going very well and started with two fine maxes.  George, flying his OS19 powered Dixielander, also started with a max.  However on George’s second flight, the climb went shallow and accelerated then the wings folded. There was a stunned silence around the field at the shock of this most reliable model disintegrating like that.  There must have been some unnoticed structural damage from the previous flight.  John rounded off his flights with an early d/t on the third flight as he had already fully exercised his new hip joint with two big retrieves.

The Caprice Contest  was run to a 1:30 max with a 50M towline.  There were three entries.  Tommy McLaughlin had flights of 1:30, 0:53, and 1:03 for a 3:26 total.   Jim Arnott had flights of  0:58,  1:30, and 1:30 for a 3:58  total.  Once again it was David Hambley that came out on top with flights of 1:30, 1:30, and 1:21 for a clear winning total of 4:21.  David added the Bob Grieve Trophy to his collection.  David Hearn resuscitated his towing skills to give some airtime to a Caprice with which Callum Sabey had won at Barkston about thirty years ago.

caprice

                                                        The contenders in the Caprice contest.

 

 

Chuck and Catapult League

 There were only two entries in the Chuck and Catapult league this year, Bill Shanks and Jim Arnott.  It was won by Jim 

jimcatapultbillgliders

Jim gets ready to release his catapult glider                                       Is the camera shaking or does Bill have a dozen gliders here

 

 

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The Caley Shield

In round one, the Power Championship, the event was won by George Blair of Edinburgh Club giving his club a 15 sec lead over the Dunfermline Club and a 42 sec lead over the Paisley Club.

Round two, the Rubber Championship, was won by Jim Arnott giving the Dunfermline club a  2min 34sec lead.

The final event, the Glider Championship, was won by David Hambley of the Dunfermline club to seal their retention of the Caledonian Shield.

The Jacobite Trophy

Himself, the Thane of Glaur, has moved residence back to Dunfermline.  David Hambley won the Jacobite Trophy with a 32 minute total, well clear of Jim Arnott in second place on 17 minutes.

trophy

 

The Free Flight League

With wins in the Lawrie Trophy, SLOP at the Scottish Nats, and the Cranfield Classic, George Blair accumulated 55 points for fourth place.  Bruce Duncan won an early season Coupe event, an indoor event for LRS, and both the Rubber and Glider events at the Scottish Nats on his way to third spot with 63 points.   David Hambley made a late season surge in winning the last three contests and moved up the table into second place.  David won the Allison, Caprice,  Jacobite and Pan-am trophies and had a total of 65 points. The league winner was Jim Arnott, who won seven events and had a points total of 77.  His wins included two indoor events, the F1a and the Power events at the Scottish Nats, the Steel, Finlayson and the Paisley Trophy.

Indoor Meetings

The indoor season has now started.  The first outing of the year was at Bathgate Academy on  October 25th  This was a trimming session.

Further dates at Bathgate have been arranged :-

All are Sundays 11am to 3pm

December 6  is a Trimming Session,   March 27  is the  Pennyplane Comp,   April 24  is the  F1L   Comp

We need to find a hall, with a clean ceiling and a low hire price, for a Living Room Stick contest in February.

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Free Flight Newsletter October 2015



                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

 

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                          October  2015

 

 

The Finlayson Trophy Day

 

The Rubber Championship for the Finlayson Trophy was held on 13th September as scheduled along with other events for Classic Glider, Classic Rubber and Power, and Combined Electric.   

 

The weather was in doubt up till Sunday morning as blustery winds, gusting to over 40 mph, hit the central belt through Saturday afternoon and evening.  However the wind did subside overnight allowing the contests to go ahead on Sunday, although it was quite a mixed bag of weather.  The wind was generally about 12 to 15 mph from the South.  There were a couple of very pleasant calmer spells balanced against some much windier spells.  It was dry until about 1pm then there were intermittent showers during the rest of the day, some of which were heavy rainfall. 

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Contestants were again thin on the ground with only  David Hambley, Bruce Duncan, George Blair and Jim Arnott flying. 

 

David was first in the air.  Flying in the BMFA’s  Combined Electric event with his E36 Super Pearl on a 12 second motor run. A good climb on his first flight was poorly rewarded by finishing in dull air and the model was down in 1:50.   The second climb was not so good after a poor release and a 1:34 flight was recorded. David got everything right on his final flight with a good launch, a high climb, and a buoyant patch of air.  The Model d/t’d from high up for a comfortable max.   

Bruce and Jim flew in the Finlayson Trophy which is a combined event, for Vintage, Classic, and BMFA models. Bruce had a comfortable max on his first flight with his 50gm BMFA model. It was during one of the breezier spell and the model drifted a long way out. Jim then maxed with his classic Urchin, which d/t’d down short of the gate leading up to the Black Law mound (which is green).  Jim returned and made his second flight.  The air was very poor and his Urchin struggled to climb then dropped quickly on the glide, but it just scraped over the max time.  There was no sign of Bruce returning from his first flight, so when downwind for his second retrieve, Jim went further out to look for Bruce. He had been away a couple of hours by then.  Scanning around and bellowing out there was no sign of Bruce. When Jim reached the top of the Black Law mound, he was relieved to Bruce fit and well in the distance, over the other side of Westruther Burn. He was coming back empty handed.  Bruce said the model had been in the air for 4 ½  mins, so it would land on other side of the river.  He came back to the cars for some food and headed off to search again.  As Jim wound his Urchin for his third flight, it started raining heavily.  He continued with the flight and the model climbed well through the pouring rain.  It was no surprise that the weight of water on the tailplane caused it to start stalling on the glide but it was high enough to max comfortably and complete Jim’s full house of maxes.  At 4 pm Bruce returned with his model and prepared for his second flight.  The model was badly out of sorts, did not climb, and came down quickly for 1:11. Being out in the rain for most of the day had spoilt its trim.

 

bruce

Bruce spent much of the day in the wet wilderness

 

George flew his OS19 powered Dixielander in the Classic Rubber/Power event and scored two nice maxes before running out of retrieval energy and retiring.   David flew in Classic Glider with his Sans Egal , which is now becoming a very consistent performer. He started with a fine max on the first flight, d/t’ing at 2:30.  David missed the good air on the second flight but the Sans Egal still returned a very respectable 1:45 flight.  There was no doubt about the third flight, made in a warm spell soon after the heavy rain had finished, and the whole moor was sweating.  The Sans Egal was climbing positively as soon as released and it continued to climb slowly despite a gentle stall.  It was at about 400ft when it d/t’d at 2:30.   In the BMFA area event, There were five fliers reached the flyoff , which was won by Colin Foster.  David was the best of the rest.

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david

David was pleased with the performance of his Sans Egal

 

 

The scores in these individual events were being rolled together to decide the winner of the Paisley Trophy.

 

 

 

 

 

1

Jim Arnott

Urchin

6:00

2

David Hambley

Sans Egal

5:45

3

George Blair

Dixielander

4:00

4

Bruce Duncan

50gm Rubber

3:11

 

 

Roll on a couple of nice days to finish the season

 

Forthcoming  Events

The Allison Trophy, all-in-mini event, remains as planned on the 27th September

On the 18th October, our main event is the Glider Championship for the Pan-Am Trophy.  The BMFA Plugge events that day are F1b and SLOP.  Other BMFA only events are F1g, E30, and Mini-Vintage.   I intend to use this day to also run the Caprice Contest, which was postponed at our last meeting.

 There has been no flying in the HLG/CLG league this year but there will be contests for these at each of the last two outings.

The Glider Championship on 18th October is the third and final round of the Caley Shield Team event.  In round one, the Power Championship, the Edinburgh Club took a 15 sec lead over the Dunfermline Club and a 42 sec lead over the Paisley Club.  After round two, the Rubber Championship,  the Dunfermline Club has a  2min 34sec lead.


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Free Flight Newsletter August 2015

                                    Scottish Aeromodellers Association

The Paisley Trophy

After three attempts to run the Paisley Trophy on Sunday 12th , Sunday 19th , and Monday 20th July the contest was abandoned to be rescheduled to one fine day in the Autumn.

The Cranfield Trophy and Steel Trophy

On Sunday 2nd of August, the weather gods gave us a break.  Between the high winds on Friday and Saturday and the high winds on Monday and Tuesday there was a period of reasonable weather that coincided with our Newbigging outing.  We were able to fly the planned Steel Trophy event and also catch up with the Cranfield Trophy contest which had been postponed due to the extended lambing season.  A Southerly wind of some 12 to 15 mph gave plenty of downwind area free from the trees.  The max in both events was set at 2:00.

There were five entries in the Cranfield Classic.  George Blair and John Eland flew Gloworms,  Allan Brown flew a Ascender #18,  Tommy McLaughlin flew a Lucky Lindy,  and Jim Arnott flew a La Bestia.  Only the Mister Max was missing from the Famous Five.  Although this wind direction is very good for avoiding trees, the high stepping through rough heather makes for an arduous retrieval when even two minute flights were travelling around ½ mile.  John soon realised that it was not possible so soon after his hip replacement and retired.  After maxing on their first flights, the other four contenders also found that it was very hard going.  However with retrieval assistance from Bruce and Ron,  and by helping each other in fetching home multiple models we somehow managed to get through the day.  Allan dropped 10 secs on his second flight for a 5:50 total.  Tommy, George and Jim completed their three maxes and faced up to the prospect of a further deciding flight.  Despite the vast open space downwind, there was little appetite for an unlimited fly-off.  A d/t fly-off would decide the event.  George was first away.  His STg20 powered Gloworm produced another textbook climb and pulled out at 400 ft into supportive air.  When the model D/t’d at one minute it took 31secs to come down.  Tommy’s Lucky Lindy climbed well but less spritely to some 250 ft and descended during the glide. It d/t’d a minute and gave an 11 secs d/t descent time.  Jim’s La Bestia had been going well during qualifying but in the fly-off he gave it a terrible launch, to the left of the wind. The model was lucky to survive a big loop before getting into its climb pattern.  It glided down for 1:04 without d/t’ing.  George was the worthy winner of the Cranfield Trophy.

 

 

Name

Model

Motor

Score

1

G Blair

Gloworm     

ST  15g20

6:00 +  1:31

2

T McLaughlin

Lucky Lindy

OS15

6:00 +  1:11

3

J Arnott

La Bestia

OS15

6:00 +  1:00

4

A Brown

Ascender  #18

ETA15d

5:50

5

J Eland

Gloworm

Censored

-

 

1

The Cranfield Trophy winner, George Blair with his ST 15g20 powered Gloworm.

There were four entries in the Steel Cup.  All were competing with F1a models.   Ron Sabey started with a nice max with his Superba.  A disappointing 1:02 second flight was followed by a 1:49 flight to set the target at 4:51.  After a 45 sec first flight, Tommy retired to concentrate on his Cranfield flying.  Bruce Duncan, flying his W-Hobby Junior returned three flights with similar times of  1:33,  1:34,  and 1:49 to take the lead with a 4:56 total.  Jim Arnott started flying his Superba after his Cranfield effort was finished.  A nice zoom launch into buoyant air gave a comfortable first flight max.  On his second flight, the air was not good but the model scraped a second max.  The third flight was another positive zoom launch into bouyant air.  The model d/t’d from height for 1:52  to win the Steel Cup with a 5:52 total.

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2

Bruce Duncan with his “Junior” F1a Glider in the Steel Cup event

The Jubilee Quaich and Caprice Contests

The weather on the 16th August for these events was very good.  The breeze from the Southwest varied between 6 and 10mph and it was dry all day. 

The rules for the Jubilee Quaich event, also known as the Progressive Nostalgia, continue to bewilder competitors but “trust me, I am a CD” satisfies most flyers.  The idea is to factorize the scores so that models which might normally be uncompetitive have an equal chance of winning.  This gives flyers the chance to bring out old favourites and rarely used models to give them an airing in a contest.  The progressive part of the event is the increasing max times.  This year the maxes were  flight 1 = 2:00, flight 2 = 2:30, and flight 3 = 3:00.

Due to illnesses and absences, there were only five members available for this usually popular event.   Tommy McLaughlin had his pretty little mini-vintage Blackpool Rock and his Vintage wakefield Horry.  John Eland and George Blair had Dixielanders; in George’s case a lightly built one powered by a PAW149.  David Hambley used his E36 Super Pearl.  Jim Arnott flew his rubber powered “1964 GMAC Rally Winner”. 

Even in this light breeze models were drifting about 1/3rd of a mile on a max flight.  John, Tommy and George retired early due to infirmities and tiredness and left it up to David and Jim to fight it out.  On his first flight, Jim’s rubber model climbed very slowly, never getting above 200 ft on a 1:40 motor run, and came down at 2:20.  That was enough for the “easy” first round max but did not auger well for rounds 2 and 3.  For the next flight, Jim added an additional four strands of 1/8th to the motor and the model was transformed.  It climbed very positively on the second flight and when it d/t’d early it still had enough height to clear the 2:30 max by a good margin.  The third flight was very similar, also d/t’ing early from high up to get his 3:00 max.  That was when Lady Luck said “enough of this good fortune for one day”. She turned her back on Jim and allowed his model to land in the trees. Very sadly, he reduced it to kit form in getting it down !   Meanwhile David was going very well with his E36. Excellent climbs on flights 1 and 2, gave comfortable maxes.  The 2:30 max on flight two carried over the trees and d/t’d down in the meadow behind.  About an hour before the end of the contest, David launched for his third flight needing a 3:00 min max to get to the fly-off. It was a nice climb pattern but we were all gob-smacked when it continued climbing for some 24 secs, instead of 15 secs.  Now David would be hard pressed to get the Super-Pearl back and make another attempt before the closing time.  With less than 10 mins remaining, a thoroughly well exercised David returned and prepared for another go.  He managed to get the timing corrected and launched the model with seconds remaining.  It was however a poor launch, not banked into its turn.  The off-pattern climb left the model at only half its usual height and it returned a disappointing 1:47 flight, leaving Jim as the winner of the Quaich.

The Caprice event was scheduled for the same day, however one event proved arduous enough and we decided to rearrange the Caprice for a later date.

Latest Despatches from the South tell of an outstanding feat of derring-do.  The Timperley Gala  at North Luffenham on 16th August had perfect weather conditions and Allan Brown was one of seven to reach the Combined Power fly-off.  Flying his Trickstar model, now powered by a K&B S40, he won with a fly-off flight of 28:58 !  Well done Allan.

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Allan with Trickstar, honing his skill at Newbigging last year.

Forthcoming  Events

The next Newbigging date is the 13th September.   Our main event that day is the Rubber Championship for the Finlayson Trophy.  The BMFA 7th area events are Team Rubber, Classic Glider, and Classic Rubber/Power as the three Plugge contests for which there are SAA events as well.  Other BMFA only events are F1c,  CE,  and HLG/CLG.

I have decided to use this day to also catch up with the postponed Paisley Trophy contest.  Your best score in the Rubber, Classic Glider, or Classic Power will be taken as your score for the Paisley or you can take the option of separately making flights directly in the Paisley Trophy. 

The Allison Trophy, all-in-mini event, remains as planned on the 27th September

On the 18th October, our main event is the Glider Championship for the Pan-Am Trophy.  The BMFA Plugge events that day are F1b and SLOP.  Other BMFA only events are F1g, E30, and Mini-Vintage.   I intend to use this day to also run the Caprice Contest, which was postponed at our last meeting.

 There has been no flying in the HLG/CLG league this year but there will be contests for these at each of the last three outings.

The Rubber championship on 13th September and the Glider Championship on 18th October are rounds two and three of the Caley Shield Team event.  In round one, the Power Championship, the Edinburgh Club established a 15 sec lead over the Dunfermline Club and a 42 sec lead over the Paisley Club.

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Free Flight Newsletter July 2015

                                    Scottish Aeromodellers Association

The Scottish Nationals 27/28 June

A breeze of about 15 mph from the West over the upwind trees provided turbulent and testing conditions for the Saturday
events at this years nationals. With the max set at two minute max, models that got away successfully would be flirting with
the trees either side of the road as they drifted towards “the gap”. We were pleased to have the company of Allan Brown
from Durham and Mick Quinn from Sunderland.

There were three entries in F1a. David Hambley and Jim Arnott started with maxes with their carbon models and Bruce
started with a 1:48 flight with his sans Egal. The second flights were very poor for everyone. David towed too fast and his
zoom rudder came in early to send the model off at half line height for a time of 50 secs. Jim then managed to get a flight of
one second less when turbulence knocked his model down in 49 secs. Although disappointing, Bruce’s 1:15 flight was
enough to take him into a 13 second lead. David had a similar poor launch in the third round for a 3:35 total. Jim managed
a second max to take his total to 4:49. Bruce needed a final flight of 1:47 to overtake that target. It was a good tow and
launch but with no help from the air, the Sans Egal was down in 1:17 for second place.

In the McManus Trophy event for Vintage models, there were four entries. Bruce Duncan flew his Leprechaun Glider. His
first flight looked set for a max but a d/t malfunction brought it down early for just 0:46. On the next two flights, Bruce did
not get the model towed high in the turbulence and flights of 0:49 and 1:06 gave him a 2:41 total. Allan Brown and George
Blair were both flying Elfin powered Mallard’s. A fast running d/t fuse resulted in a 1:47 first and only flight for George.
Allan had more success with his Mallard with a comfortable high max on the first flight. On the second, a tactical early d/t
to miss the trees was slightly misjudged with the model on the ground 4 seconds short of the max. A final max gave Allan a
5:56 total. Mick Quinn’s OS25 powered model was climbing very high and achieved the three maxes with ease to win the
McManus Trophy. He did very well to get it back three times from long retrieves into the hinterlands.

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Mick Quinn won the McManus Trophy with this Vintage power model
– I can’t remember the name exactly “San De” something
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There were four entries in the SLOP event for the DMAC Power Trophy. Tommy McLaughlin, with his OS Pet powered
Dixiechick and John Eland, with his OS15 Powered Dixielander started early during the worst of the weather and had
difficulty getting away through the turbulence. By early afternoon John’s modest two flight total of 2:24 looked like it might
be a winning score as the wind was blowing hard and anyone starting chasing his total would need two successful flights.
However by 3pm the breeze was moderating and Allan, now finished his Vintage flights, prepared his K&B20 powered
“Slowquell” SLOP model. An offer of retrieval services from Bruce and Jim persuaded George to also start flying his OS19
powered Dixielander. By 5pm both had achieved their three maxes. Allan was exhausted but George was fresh as a daisy.
In the fly-off neither was happy with their flights but Allan was the clear winner with a 2:42 time against George’s 2:16.

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Allan Brown’s won the DMAC Power Trophy
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As forecast, the wind on Sunday was still from the West and was considerably higher than Saturday, resulting in vicious
turbulence from the upwind conifer plantation. With such a poor forecast Allan and Mick had wisely decided not to repeat
the long journey north. John Eland still recovering from his recent hip replacement was not fit for a second days exercise.
Tommy Mclaughlin, after a depressing day on Saturday could not raise enthusiasm for a second day of torment. For the
Sunday events, contestants were thin on the ground.

There were three entries in the Flying Dutchman Trophy contest which was run to the Bmfa Power rules. This limits nonsystems
models to a 9 second motor run. David Hambley flying his new E36 the Super Pearlite was first away and despite
being tossed around in the turbulence it did a flight of 1:17 which looked very useful in the conditions. Jim found a slight
lull when launching his OS15 powered Dixielander. After a nice climb and transition, it looked set for a max but the air
decayed and it came down quickly for a 1:38 flight. George Blair’s OS19 powered Dixielander had lost its usual reliable
trim. Going flat on the climb, it then had a poor transition resulting in a 1:28 flight. On the second flights, maxes from
George and David, and a 1:52 flight from Jim meant the contest remained very close. Jim had a slim 2 second advantage
over George, and an 11 seconds lead over David. Jim was first away for the final flight. Another good climb and transition
put the model at about 350 ft but the air was not helpful and the model descended steadily. As it disappeared over the brow
of the hill at the end of the road it was clocked of at 2:07, having scraped the max needed to win. George did not take his
third flight and David added enough time to take second place.

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Jim Arnott with his Dixielander won the Flying Dutchman Trophy
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By lunch time the wind strength had increased further to 9m/S but Bruce Duncan put in three exceptional flights during this
windiest part of the day to retain the Waulkmill Trophy for the Bmfa Rubber class. His first two maxes were with his
BoPeep model and his final max was with his classic Delinquent model.

Two minute flights now being carried as far as the Weston Cottages village. Since no one had put in any flights in the Bmfa
Glider event, it was decided to use a DT fly off at the end of the day to decide this event, in the hope that the wind might
moderate during late afternoon. This proved to be the case and so just after 17:00 Bruce, Jim and David went out to do battle.

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The prime suspects before the Bmfa Glider Fly-off
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It was an incident packed few minutes. David was first away with his Old Peculiar. It handled the turbulence well on tow
but his towline did not release from the model resulting in an attempt. The re-flight was also unsuccessful due to a setup
error on the model, so his final score was zero. Jim now tried his luck with his classic Inchworm. Towing with a half line
initially and paying out the remainder as the model went up resulted in a steady and smooth tow, but then he could not
disengage the towline as the model accelerated at the top. This resulted in excessive stress on the model's wing which
exploded under the pressure. Quite a surprise, what with the Inchworms 1/4” sq and 3/16” sq spruce spars - another null
score. Bruce just had to get his Sans Egal up and off, and clock a few seconds flight time to win. This he did handsomely
with an excellent tow, release and glide for the conditions. The model d/t’d at 1:05, from about 40 ft up, and landed in the
hedgerow at the end of the meadow 7 secs later. Bruce had won the Ian Granger Trophy, his second trophy of the day.

By the time the prize giving was over and all models recovered, the sun was shining and the wind was moderating rapidly. It
would have been a nice evening for trimming had anyone sufficient energy. For this group of weary competitors it was time
for home.
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Correction to the British Nats results.

I see that there has been a correction made to the F1a results for Barkston. John Cooper’s total has been reduced by 30 secs.
Like David and I, he probably flew a 2:30 flight in the last round, not realizing that the max had been reduced to 2:00, and
erroneously had the full time attributed to his total. That correction drops John out of 5th place, and promotes David
Hambley and Stu Damon to 5th equal.

New site License Agreement.

I have just signed a new agreement with Lea and Carnwath Estates for a further 3 years at the Newbigging site. There is no
change to the terms of the agreement. The cost has increased slightly to £250 per annum.

Rescheduled Cranfield Trophy event.

The Cranfield Trophy event which was planned for 10th May had to be abandoned due to the extended lambi
ng period this
year. It is now planned to run it on 2nd August, alongside the Steel Trophy ( F1a/F1b ) contest

Free Flight Newsletter June 2015

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                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                           June  2015

The British Nationals.

Three members; Ron Sabey, David Hambley,and Jim Arnott travelled down to Barkston Heath in Linconshire for the British Free Flight Nationals over the Whitsun Bank Holiday weekend. When we arrived on Friday afternoon and made camp there was a stiff wind blowing which barred any thoughts of a last minute trimming session. We settled for a brisk walk around the fishing lakes at the Woodland Waters camp site and a meal in Woody’s restaurant, with portions which would have defeated Desperate Dan.

On Saturday morning there was a breeze of about 12 mph from the east and control was based near the Flying School at the east side of the airfield. David flew in the E36 class. After a few test flights with his new model, he decided that this would require more time to fully trim and he reverted to his well proven Super Pearl model for the contest flights. The decision was rewarded with a very nice comfortable max on its first flight. On the second flight a bad launch from David saw the model loop and come in heavily for 15 sec. There was no damage apart from a broken prop and the sub 20 sec time allowed a second attempt at flight two. This time David launched it perfectly and the Super Pearl scored another comfortable max. For the third flight, with the motor run reduced to 10 secs, the Super Pearl again climbed nicely and returned the max required to qualify for the fly-off.

Ron flew in BMFA glider with his Junior A/2. On his first flight he found a good patch of supportive air and the model was well on its way to a max, but a mis-set D/T brought the flight to disappointing early end. Ron spent the rest of the day trimming his two vintage gliders, the Nord and the Odenman.

Jim flew in BMFA Rubber using an Urchin with a modern prop. On his first flight, it was clear soon after launch that he had chosen the air badly as the model was struggling to climb. When the prop folded it looked high enough to get the max, but the Urchin then started to stall and it landed 5 secs short of the required time. Jim’s second flight took the small step from the ridiculous to the sublime. Launched into a big thermal, it d/t’d very high up at 2:30 and took another five minutes to come down by which time it had drifted about 1 ½ miles and was way off the airfield. By the time Jim fetched that one back he was physically wrecked and retired for the day.

In the afternoon David turned his attention to BMFA Glider, flying his straight tow Old Peculiar. With the drift now coming from the South East, David towed along the peri-track towards the small hanger until he felt an encouraging tug on the line. The Old peculiar settled into a buoyant patch of air and held towline height until the max was achieved. Two very similar flights in well chosen air followed to give David the three maxes he needed. It was a very good day indeed for David in qualifying for two fly-offs.

For the fly-off’s control moved to the South East corner of the airfield and the 10 mph breeze was towards the beacon outhouse. The temperature was distinctly cool and there was little lift around when the E36 flyoff started. David was one of five fliers in the fly-off. His motor run of 3.5 secs was well short of the 5 secs allowance and despite a good pattern climb his model was always below the others and was down in 54 secs in fifth place.

There were 17 fliers qualified for the BMFA Glider flyoff, which started at 7:50pm. Some late evening sunshine was a mixed blessing with slightly warmer air but the models were drifting straight into the setting sun which made timekeeping difficult. David’s tow and launch were good and the Old Peculiar held up well in some gently supportive air for a good flight of 3:41. As the times came back to control it was clear that others had found better patches of air and David finished in joint 8th place. The event was won by Richard Jack with a flight of 5:34


old peculiar

David in the BMFA Glider Fly-off with his Old Peculiar

Sunday morning started with a breeze of some 12 mph from the West-southwest. It was overcast and threatening to rain. Our expeditionary team all flew in F1a Glider. The max for the first two rounds was set at 2:00 and these flights had to be completed by 12 noon. There would be three scheduled rounds in the afternoon. David, Ron and Jim all started well with a max on their first flight. In the second round, Jim got his max but Ron and Davids’ were in really poor air and down in 1:04 and 1:28.

For round 3 and round 4, the max was increased to 2:30. The wind had now freshened to 15 mph. David and Jim found good patches of lift for comfortable maxes in Round 3, but Ron retired from the event after dropping more time. Jim was lucky then unlucky on this flight. As his Superba d/t down in-line with the small hanger it was unclear, from a mile away, if it was on the hanger roof or over. When he reached it, he was delighted to see it lying on the grass 20 ft behind the hanger. Then he discovered that it had hit a solitary telegraph pole, broken the tailplane, and ripped the wing covering. Some quick field repairs with carbon tow and superglue, then Magictape to cover the holes soon had it ready for round 4.

In round 4, David had another comfortable max while Jim had more dramatics. At the point of release his model would not come of the line and he pulled it back in as gently as he could for a second attempt. The second attempt was good and the model went away for a comfortable max finishing tight in the southeast corner of the drome. With the more testing wind conditions and longer maxes. many entrants had dropped time over rounds 3 and 4 and there were now only four fliers with full scores – Phil Ball, Brian Baines, John Williams, and Jim.

The breeze freshened more for round 5, to say 18 mph. It was like a fly-off atmosphere with those four fliers watching each other. Jim was first away with a good launch into what felt like nice air. Phil followed immediately with a straight tow and high bunting release. After looking good for two circles, Jim’s Superba lost the good air and started dropping. A couple of circles later it was climbing again and finished high up and well off the drome, to give him a place in the fly-off. John William’s max was never in doubt after a super launch, however Brian Baines needed a slice of luck after a mistimed launch saw his model bunt down to 50 ft before being picked up by good air for his max. So the same four flyers continued into the fly-off with full scores.

David finished his event with another nice max which d/t’d down off the airfield, which moved him further up the rankings to finish in 6th place alongside Stu Darmon, and 4 secs behind John Cooper in 5th place. Then David and Jim discovered that the max for round five had been reduced from 2:30 to 2:00. No harm done but, if we had known, it might have kept us on the airfield and made model retrieval much easier.

As the crowds gather around control to at 6pm to see what the fly-off schedule would be, it was noted that the members of the Free Flight Technical Committee were huddled together in deep debate. When they broke up they announced that there had been a complaint from the farmer directly downwind about us disturbing the English Partridges that he is breeding in the hedgerows surrounding his fields. There would be no fly-off’s and flying was finished for the day. The score at the end of round five were the final result and the four F1a leaders was declared 1st equal. There was a similar position in F1b, F1c, and Vintage Power/Rubber.

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first equal

Tired but happy after 5th max - Jim 1st equal in F1a

On Monday morning there was an announcement that, since the wind was blowing in the same direction, all events would be run to a 1:30 max to keep models on the airfield as far as possible. The wind was quite a bit lighter at 10 mph and anything under 4 minutes would stay on the field. These benign conditions remained all day and it became a case of trying to avoid that pervasive moment of senility which catches you by surprise.

David flew in Classic Glider with his Sans Egal and it was flying nicely on its way to achieving the three maxes.

Ron flew in Classic Glider with his Seraph and Vintage Glider with his new model, the Odenman A/2. He achieved the necessary flight times with both to book his place in two fly-offs. He was particularly pleased with the performance of the Odenman which did comfortable max flights even though Ron was launching of a 75M line rather than the 100M line allowed.

Jim flew in Mini-vintage with his Gollywock and Classic Rubber with his Urchin. Both completed their max flights to get into the fly-offs.

By 5pm, along with most of the other contestants we had completed our full house in all five events. There had been moments of doubt with at least three “early” d/t’s but in all cases the flights had been high enough to max anyway. The Free Flight Tech Committee announced that they had successfully negotiated with the farmer and we were now clear to have normal unlimited flyoffs. With over sixty fliers qualified for the various fly-offs and the wind now freshening to 15 mph, the poor farmer was now about to be bombarded with models.


ron

Ron prepares his Seraph for the Classic Glider Fly-off

In the mini-vintage flyoff, Jim’s Gollywock was up and down in mediocre air in a disappointing 2:14 to finish in 11th place.

In Classic Glider, David launched his Sans Egal into what looked like good air, but surprisingly it developed a stall which prevented it going away and it was down in 2:49 for 6th place. In the same event when Ron towed up his Seraph, the wings were bending as it strained to get away in a boomer, but on release it failed to drop the towline. Without the autorudder it flew a massive left hand circle to take it out of the lift and land safely. The line caught on the ground low down and allowed the Seraph to fly free from 50 ft up for a 44sec time.

Next up, Ron was in Vintage Glider with the Odenman. He towed it on a 100M line for the first time. It was a weaving quite a bit but Ron managed to release it nicely into its turn around 80M height. The model was gliding very well but it did not find true lifting air and it eased its way down for a time of 3:13, landing just inside the perimeter fence. This gave Ron 4th position.

Our final event was the Classic Rubber/Power, where Jim was flying an Urchin. It was a similar tale for Jim, with a good steady flight but missing the best of the lift for a time of 3:50. The model was well off the field and was eventually tracked into the farm courtyard of our partridge farmer.


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jim

Jim gets his Urchin away in the Classic Rubber Fly-off - photo D Hipperson.

Chris Edge had a very good day in F1h, qualifying for a four way fly-off, then winning handsomely with a 5:09 flight while the other contenders were under 2 mins.

Unusually we had enjoyed good flyable conditions on all three days and it was great to have it dry all weekend. Having two fly-off spots on Saturday, one on Sunday, and five on Monday showed that we are still contenders at this level, and had Lady Lucky smiled a little more kindly we could have had bonanza of trophies. It had been a very good weekend despite the partridges. .

Lawrie Trophy Contest.

The gales that blew across the country on Saturday 6th June had only started to subside on Sunday 7th when the Lawrie Trophy contest was due to be held. The wind was still blowing at over 20 mph from the West and the contest was abandoned. However in a moment of uncommon alertness, it occurred to the CD that all the likely contenders for this Power Championship event were retired gentlemen and they might be available the following day when the weather was forecast to be excellent. So it was that the Lawrie Trophy event was held on Monday 8th June in splendid conditions. There was a drift of a few mph, generally from the North, and it was pleasantly warm and dry all day. In the absence of John Eland who is still recovering from his hip operation, the four power fliers competed. Tommy McLaughlin flew his OS15 powered classic Geef, Jim Arnott flew an OS15 powered Vintage All American, David Hambley flew his E36 Super Pearl, and George Blair flew his OS19 powered Dixielander.

The contest was very close. All four fliers started with a max on their first flight.

On the second flights, David’s model was in very poor air and was down-drafted for a 2:10 flight , while Tommy, Jim and George scored a second max.

On the third flight, Jim dropped time when his All American lost it’s glide turn and headed off crosswind towards the trees at Weston farm. It was clocked off at 2:07 behind the trees for a 7:07 total score. Tommy then also dropped time. His best climb of the day finished in poor air and the Geef was down in a very disappointing 1:43 and total of 6:43. David Hambley maxed on his third flight to take his total to 7:10.

George needed a flight of 2:11 to win. Surely a formality as his Dixielander had been very nicely on trim all day. Another nice spiral climb took the model to about 500 ft in 11 secs, but it was in poor air and dropping very quickly. For a few moments there were doubts but the Dixielander held on for a 2:25 flight and won by 15 secs.


grorge

George Blair won the Lawrie Trophy with his Dixielander


Free Flight Newsletter April 2015

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                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                           Apr  2015

The 2015 outdoor season started well with unexpected good weather for the first BMFA Area event on 8th February. Thereafter the weather fell back into its expected norm.  The 2nd Area outing on 1st March  and  the 3rd Area outing on 22nd March were cancelled due to windy conditions. 

1st Area Events   
The weather had been exceptionally pleasant in the few days prior to Sunday 8th February.  It was forecast to start breaking up on the Sunday with a freshening breeze from the West developing through the day.  Fortunately the incoming low pressure was slower moving than expected and we had a pleasant dry day with light wind to get the season off to a good start. 
In the Coupe event, there were three entries.  Jim Arnott started with a 1:03 flight when his model power stalled to waste the initial power surge.  After making a little rudder adjustment, he had one of his moronic moments when test gliding the model from the car boot into the field only to see it turn around and shred itself against the fence. Tommy McLaughlin struggled to get a consistent trim on his model and returned flights of  0:53, 1:03, and 0:13.   Bruce Duncan showed the way with flights of 1:05 and 1:24 followed by a nice max to give a winning score of 4:29.

David Hambley flew in the E36 contest with his Super Pearl.  In this class the rules specify a 15 sec motor run for flights one and two, a 10 sec motor run for flight three, and a 5 second motor run if there is a fly-off.  David completed the first two maxes with ease with the model looking in good trim.  After a good climb on flight three, it was a great surprise when it started stalling viciously for a sub-max flight of 1:33.  On retrieval the reason was obvious –  a loosened grub screw had allowed the motor to detached from its mount. Thereafter, purely for interest, David made a 5 sec motor run flight of 0:53 secs.  In the area event, David’s 5:33 total gave him 7th place out of the 15 entries.  Three had made it to the fly-off, which Trevor Grey won with a 3:35 flight

image2
David Hambley with his E36 Model.

In the Mini-Vintage event, Bruce flew a Bazooka, Tommy flew a Blackpool Rock, and Jim flew a Gollywock.  Three  very pretty flights from the Blackpool Rock gave Tommy a 3:16 total.  Bruce had flights of 1:31, 0:57, and 1:13 for a 3:42 total. Jim’s Gollywock flights were 1:38, 2:00, and 1:30 for a winning 5:08 total.

image4
Tommy  McLaughlin with his Blackpool Rock mini-vintage model

Indoor Events

Unaffected by the weather, the full programme of indoor events went ahead as planned – Pennyplanes at Bathgate on 15th February,  Living Room Stick at the Barony College on 15th March and the EZB event at Bathgate on 5th April.

Urlan, Bruce, Ron and Jim flew in the Pennyplane contest. We all had 5 min plus flights. Urlan had 5:35 and 5:43 flights.  Bruce struggled to keep his models out the girders, but got a 6:14 flight late on to add to his 5:25 for a 11:39 total.  Ron led the way for most of the day with flights of 6:03 and 5:55 for an 11:58 total.  Jim pulled out the best flight of the day with a 6:21, which added to his 5:36 flight placed him 1 second behind Ron. A 5:48 backup flight then gave Jim the lead momentarily before Ron pushed his total to 12:17 with a 6:14.  As Ron started packing up, Jim snatched the lead back with a 5:59 for a 3 sec lead and followed by a final 6:02 flight.  A resounding win by just 6 secs!

On 15th March for the LRS contest, we were back in the hall at the Barony College for the first time for two years and we realized how much we have missed this nice smooth ceiling which allows models to flit around against it without the risk of a hang up.   The same four members competed.  Ron was flying a new LRS and steadily improved through the session to record 3:17 and 3:42 best times.  Urlan and Jim were recording times around the 4 ½  minute mark most of the day and finished with totals of 8:49 and 8:50 respectively for their best two.  Having acquired one of Jim’s “useless scrap”  LRS’s, Bruce  applied his talents to getting it sorted.  Starting with 2 ½ min flights, he moved through the 3 minute range, and over the four minute.  Eventually an outstanding 4:59 flight with a 4:26 backup time made him the clear winner.
 
There were only two entries in the EZB ( F1L ) contest at Bathgate on 5th April.  The conditions in the hall appeared to be excellent with very stable air and no drift.  Once we were flying we realized that there were significant temperature changes occurring in the air which could change your flight time by around a minute.  Urlan’s best flights of 9:08 and 9:09 would win most EZB contests, but not this day as Jim set a new personnel best and broke the 10 min barrier for his first time with a 10:03 flight.  His second best flight of 9:24 gave a winning 19:27 total.  
Jim has been regularly doing  9 min plus flights for the last three season and was starting to doubt whether he could achieve that magic 10.  When it happened it was with a 3 year old model and a five year old prop and by chance hitting the right rubber for the day – a 12” loop of  .056”.   He is still a long way short of Aubrey’s 10:43 Scottish record.

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Lambing  Season

I now have more detail of this year’s lambing schedule and the implications for our contest calendar. 

George and Fiona Donald at North Deanhead have advised that their lambing will again run from 20th April to 20th May on the Burngrange moorland to the north side of the road.  Carey Coombs at Weston expects our April break to cover his peak activity and he will be putting ewes with lambs onto the moorland to the South of the road from the 8th April. 
 
As always our priority is to give no cause for concern to the farmers and we recognise that this is a sensitive period while ewes and cows are bonding with their newborn, so we will not have any contests at Newbigging before the end of May, and the Cranfield Classic event on the 10th May will be rescheduled to later in the year.   

With care we will be able to do some short test flights during the period :- 
If we avoid drifting to the south and over the road then we can use the Burngrange moor for test flights up to the 19th April.

From  20th April to 30th April there will be no trimming. 

From the 1st May  we can use the Weston Farm land to the South of the road but must avoid drifting to the north, over the road.

From 21st May we are clear to fly as normal.

Rule Changes:-

The FFTC committee decided to leave the rule for binocular magnification unchanged – at a maximum of 8 X magnification. 
It was decided that the designs in the Zaic Yearbook 1959/61 would be accepted in Classic Contests on the basis that the yearbook was collated before the cut off date of 1st Jan 1961.
The rules for timing electric motor runs were clarified due to the problem of timekeepers recognising exactly when the motor stopped on a busy and noisy flying site: -   
The motor run is to be verified by the timekeeper check timing on the ground before flying. The motor run will be deemed to begin when the motor timer starts and end when the prop ceases to rotate. The timekeeper shall mark the flight card to affirm this. It is only required that the ground timing procedure is carried out before the first flight, unless the motor run needs to be changed when the process must be repeated. The motor run shall not be checked in flight.

                        Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

Free Flight Newsletter November 2014

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The Pan-Am Trophy

The Glider championship was held on the 12th October in excellent conditions. The drift was from the west but as it was never more than a few mph, we could flying from the meadow and achieve a 2:30 max flight without reaching the Weston trees. Apart from a couple of short light showers it was dry all day. In the overcast and cool conditions, there were weak thermals to be found and gentle downdrafts to be avoided.

There were only three entries. Tommy McLaughlin, flying his Sija, started with a very good max with the model making the best of some buoyant air. His second flight missed the good air but still made a very respectable 2:19. Tommy’s final flight had a very open glide and flew straight downwind. It looked set for a max but unfortunately at 2:05 it caught the trees and spun down to the ground, giving Tommy a 6:54 total. Jim Arnott flew his large Open Glider. The first two flights were comfortable maxes, but the third was poor air and down in 2:11, giving him a total of 7:11. David Hambley decided to fly his classic Sans Egal in preference to his A/2’s in the hope that it’s lighter wing loading might suit the conditions. After an extensive trimming session, David had the model well sorted when he started the contest with a very nice max. He had a another solid max in good air but a downdrafted flight of 1:56 left him short of Jim’s total. We had all had two good flights and a clanger, it was simply a case of whose clanger was the smallest.

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Bruce about to release Jim’s Pan-Am Trophy winning model

Chris Edge joined us for the day and flew in the BMFA area event. He suffered the same fate of two good flights and one downer for a 7:15 total. With benign conditions across all of the UK, 17 out of the 51 entries in the Area event reached the fly-off with three maxes. Julian Pennington of Bristol and West won with a 5:33 fly-off time.

John Eland and George Blair flew in the Combined Classic event. George was flying his OS19 powered Dixielander, none the worse after its dirty stop-out in the silage field. John was flying his Gloworm which was going better with the extra power of a Paw19 instead of the Paw15 used in the Cranfield. John got his three maxes but to everyone’s amazement George dropped a flight with a 2:25 in bad air. By fly-off time the breeze at swung round and models were being carried due South. The fly-off could be unlimited with no risk of trees. Unfortunately John had a motor overrun in the fly-off for a zero score. The flight was 2:39 in poor air. There were 27 entries in this BMFA contest and 13 of them reached the fly-off. Phil Ball won with a 6:40 flight.

The Allison Trophy

The Allison Trophy contest was originally scheduled for 26th October, but had to be postponed due to gale force winds sweeping the country. It was rescheduled to 9th November, when we were blessed with a really good day. There was a light breeze of about 5 mph from the South. It was dry all day, generally overcast with some sunny spells which generated patches of light lift. Even with a temperature of around 9C it felt pleasantly warm as there was no wind chill. These were perfect conditions for a free flight contest.

There were seven entries in the Allison comprising one A/1, two Coupes, two 1/2A power and two Mini-vintage rubber models. To offset the performance advantages of 1/2A and mini-vintage, the coupes and A/1s flight times were multiplied by a factor of 1.2.

David Hambley, flying his Little Hinney, started with a nice max but struggled thereafter with a poor 54 sec second flight and failed to get a third score in. Bruce Duncan, with his coupe, also started well with a max but followed with two poorer scores of 1:37 and 1:31 for 5:08 total. George Blair’s 1/2A Witchhawk was on good trim but it d/t’d early on two flights due to fast running fuse. ( the rumours that I was seen dousing his fuse in diesel fuel are quite unfounded - the brandy from my first aid box may have touched his fuse accidentally). Mick Quinn’s Dyna-Mite mini vintage model maxed the first two flights despite an overly tight glide circle, however the third flight was not so lucky and was down in 1:45 for a 5:45 total.

Allan Brown had a very trying day. After creaming his MiniWeaver onto the road under power, Allan had his DidiLander ( 80% size Dixielander ) going great and maxed the first two flights. On his third flight he had an overrun, and then Allan over compensated with a short run on the second attempt which saw the model down in 1:48 for a 5:48 total. Allan then turned to flying a mini-vintage power model, a Paw80 powered Flys Eye. It climbed very well on its 20 sec motor run and was it good air, then it failed to d/t and we watched for some 15 minutes until it climbed into the clouds at 1500 ft. Allan listen to the chirp from its beacon for another 15 mins or so before this stopped, indicating that the model had landed. Despite a very good line, due North, Allan and Mick were unable pick up the signal again or find the model.

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Allan’s 1/2A Power Didilander

Tommy McLaughlin flew his multi systems F1g but struggled with the set up all day. The first flight climbed left and glided left but it was only six seconds short of the max. The first attempt at the second flight was spoilt when the prop assembly fell off at the end of the motor run. On the second attempt at flight two, the model climbed straight ahead and had little glide turn but it was in good air and landed at 2:47 for a comfortable max. The third flight, I did not see but the 1:45 flight was enough to factor up to a max giving Tommy a 5:54 total. To achieve this total with a model that was never fully trimmed is testament to the potential of Tommy’s F1g. Jim Arnott’s Gollywock was on good form, nicely in trim and finding helpful air on each of its three flights to complete the winning full house with three comfortable maxes. It is days like these that remind us why we make all the effort. An excellent final outing to Newbigging for the 2014 season which sent fliers home charged with enthusiasm and dreaming of similar days to come next season.

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Bill’s Chuckie League

The advantage of catapult launch gliders over hand launch glider allowed Jim to dominate the contest this year. Do not be surprised to see Bruce with a catapult glider next season.


15 June

13 July

27 July

24 Aug

14 Sep

28 Sep

12 Oct

9 Nov

Total Points

Jim Arnott

10

7


5

7

7

7

10

53

Bruce Duncan

7

5

5


5



7

29

Bill Shanks

5





5

5

5

20

Jacobite Trophy

The Jacobite Trophy is a year long accumulation of non-contest flight times. The format was designed to allow a series of one minute plus flights to contribute to your score. One might have expected that some retired gentleman who is flying for fun and trimming models to fill his surfeit of spare time would be a clear favourite against someone in full time employment. However it appears not as Bruce was again the clear winner of the Jacobite Trophy. Himself, the Thane of Glaur, remains in residence in Perth for another year. Bruce’s total score was 81 minutes, aided by one 19 minute flight when a rubber model failed to d/t. With a logged time of 36 mins, David Hambley was the only significant opposition. After booking in 7 mins during two outings in May, Jim failed to “ think Jacobite” for the rest of the season and finished third with that total.

( Jacobite 2015 is now open. Cards will be available at the first outing but if the opportunity arises feel free to start earlier and transfer the flight details to the score card when you get it )

The Caley Shield

With the top scores in the Rubber and Glider championships , and second place in the Power championship the Dunfermline Club retained the Caledonian Shield for 2014.

Free Flight League

The league was wide open prior to the last four contests being settled. Jim Arnott had a very strong finish to the season, winning three of these last four events to claim the league championship. His 71 point total included 5 wins and three second places. In second place with 61 points was George Blair, which was an outstanding result for someone who flies only power models.

Filling the next places were Bruce Duncan ( 56 pts ), Tommy McLaughlin ( 54 pts ) and David Hambley ( 49 pts ).

British Free Flight Nationals

Great News - The Free Flight Technical Committee have advised :-

“ the use of Barkston Heath has been agreed for the 2015 Free Flight Nationals. However, the overall situation regarding model flying there remains unchanged “

Nostalgia is a seductive liar

In 1962 a scientifically minded schoolboy who was a keen aeromodeller decided that he would start logically developing his own world beating rubber model. He started a log book in which to record details of his models and the changes he was making to each new variation. Mk1 had a 28 inch span wing, sheet box fuselage, and a 10 inch free wheeling prop from a Senator. It is recorded as having a still air time of 1:30.

By the time of MK3 the size was up to a 40”x 5” wing, built up fuselage and a 21” x 27” prop. The prop was meant to be a double blade folder, which free-wheeled before hitting a stop and folding. When it bounced of the stop and folded at different places spoiling the glide, the stop was removed and the prop was allowed to freewheel throughout the glide. This was thought to be a major design breakthrough as it allowed a well tried freewheeling mechanism to be used but the big props would partially fold out of the airstream and they would not get damaged on landings. The glide was surprisingly good. With 5 ounces ( 135 gms ) of Pirelli on board the still air time was now recorded as 3:40. It had no contest success. At the two contests where it was used, it was too windy for a test flight and the young genius twice failed to notice that his tail packing was missing before making his first flight. At both contests, the model maxed on the second and third flights. ( such basic errors would surely not happen when he got older )

By 1964, the boy was onto MK5. It was a bit bigger again at 46” span and had a proper prop fold mechanism. Extensive trials had been done on the pro’s and con’s of a 16str of ¼” 5oz motor versus a 12str of 1/4“ 3oz motor and the latter was now the standard as the performance was as good due to a better glide and the model was less prone to damage on landings. MK5 had rather a false start with a pair of paddles that were meant to flare on high torque but were just grossly inefficient. Once a standard prop was fitted, MK5 started performing well. It was recorded in the log book that on 1000 turns it had a motor run of 1:40 and a standard flight time of 4:30.

This model was used in five contests in 1964, getting a 3rd, a 2nd and two 1st places. It had 16 contest flights. Eleven of these were three minute maxes; and two of the non-maxes were out of sight in the air. It looked like the young boy was well on the way to his world beater. However, instead of kicking on to further success, the entries in the log book simply stop as the boy was lost to aeromodelling for many years.

Ocassionally, I have happened across this notebook and have browsed through it for amusement. I had never considered rebuilding any of the models even though there were detailed scale drawings and full size wing sections for each of them. Two months when I was ditching a big pile of papers from my first proper job, I found a folded up piece of wallpaper. When I spread it out, there was a plan for MK5 from 1964 that I did not know I had. The plan had been built on unprotected but it was still very useable. It is 2014 – it is fifty years on - I am hooked - I just have to build it and fly it before the end of 2014.

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And so here we are at Newbigging on 9th of November 2014 for initial test flights, with the model weighing in at 105gms it is some 20gms heavier than the original. These initial flights went very well in the short time I gave it. The model trimmed out easily. It was stable but overly sedate on the 12 strands of 3/16” 50 gm motor. I managed to get up to ¾ full turns without mishap and this gave a 2 minute flight. If I had been brave enough to load it up with the original 12 strands of ¼ motor then we can be sure it would be good for that 4 ½ minutes in still air time !

Season 2015 Contest Calendar

The first draft of the calendar for next season is attached. There are seven area dates compared to eight in recent years and the contests to be run at each area event has still to be decided. When these are available, I will align our glider, rubber and power championship with the area team glider, rubber and power events. For the Allison Trophy I have included the mini electric class E36, which has a performance similar to that of 1/2A and Mini-Vintage.

Entry Fees and Field Rental for 2015

The finances for 2014 were fairly well balance and I propose to leave the outdoor contest entry fees at £3:00 per event and the Site Charge will remain at £15.00 for the season or £3:00 per day.

Potential Rules changes for 2015

Among the changes being discussed are to drop the 8 time magnification limit on binoculars ( to fall in line with the FAI’s min of 7 times magnification ) and to explicitly allow the designs in Zaic Yearbook 1959-1961 to be admitted as Classic’s designed before Jan 1961 on basis that the book was collated well before it hit the streets. The FFTC have been receiving feedback on these and other proposals are will make their decision before the start of the season.

* * Stop Press * *

Ron had a brain scan last week, three months after the end of his course of chemotherapy. He has just received the consultant’s analysis of the scan. There is no sign of any growth where the malignant cancer was removed. That is wonderful news. In addition Ron feels that his general wellbeing is slowly improving as the residual effects of the chemo work their way out of his system. There will be a further scan in three months time.

Free Flight Newsletter October 2014

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                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                                    Oct  2014

 

I have fallen down on the task of writing the newsletter over the past several weeks and I now have the dredge the dark recesses of my failing memory  to recall some of what happened .

There were four entries for the Lawrie Trophy contest on 13th July.  There was a breeze of some 10mph from the west initially which put the trees at Weston in range and the max was set at 2:00.  Later in the day the drift moved to Northwest giving a clearer line but then the copse of trees by the old railway line became a more remote hazard.  Tommy McLaughlin flew his OS Pet powered Dixiechick and flights of 1:18, 1:57, and 1:04 gave him a 4:21 total.    David Hambley flew his Super Pearl E36 model as an open electric on a 15 sec run.  It was the models first contest outing and David was delighted to get off the mark with a max flight.  The second flight was 1:55.  Something in the power train went wrong on his final flight and David could not get the motor running, and he finished with the 3:55 total. ( David later found a dry solder joint was the problem ).  Jim Arnott flew his vintage All American and started with two maxes despite the model being in a marginal trim.  He came unstuck on his third flight when the model rolled too much on the climb and then spiralled in to the left on the glide for a 1:33 flight and a 5:33 total.  George Blair’s OS19 powered Dixielander produced three excellent max flights to win the  Lawrie Trophy. 

George has flown in five events so far this year and maxed out in each of them – Brit Nats Classic, Paisley Trophy, Scot Nats SLOP, Scot Nats Power, and now the Lawrie Trophy – a brilliant season.

Despite an exhaustive search George’s Dixielander could not be found after his third flight.   It was seen d/t’ing down on a well marked line but it must have tucked itself very well in somewhere as it could not be seen. Almost three weeks later, Carey Coombes spotted the Dixie in his clover silage field.  He was having a drive over the field to check it was ready for gathering in.  It was and his mower would have shredded the Dixie the following day.

In the Classic Glider event on the same day Bruce did two nice max flights with his Sans Egal to win. David Hambley with his Caprice was the only other entrant.

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The weather for the Cranfield  Classic on  27th July was very similar to the last outing with a 10 mph breeze from the West towards the trees at Weston and again the max was set to 2 mins.  On this day the wind direction did not swing away from the woods and they remained a threat all day.  There were five entries.  Allan Brown flew his Eta15 powered Ascender #18.  After a 1:54 first flight, Allan had a poor second flight of 1:21.  He then switched to his ST powered La Bestia only to see this piling in from launch.  It was a bad day for La Bestia’s as Jim Arnott’s version also had problems.  The first flight was on a good trim and a nice max.  It D/T’d down in the bull arena. The second flight was disasterous, piling in twice in quick succession for a zero score. John Eland flew his Paw249 powered Gloworm.  The combination of an overweight model and an underperforming motor left him with a very sedate and uncompetitive model.  The real contenders for the trophy were George Blair and Tommy Mclaughlin.  George, flying his ST15 powered Gloworm started with two fine maxes but the second flight d/t’d down into the trees.  It was spotted unretrievably high in the trees and had to be abandoned.  Tommy started with a fine max, followed with a second flight of 1:47, and had a fine max on his final flight to win the event.   Tommy was flying an OS15 powered Lucky Lindy built by Ian Granger.  Tommy found it rather spooky how close the model was landing to Ian’s memorial oak tree at the edge of the bull field.

George’s Gloworm was shaken out of the trees by strong winds a few days later. Although the fuselage was broken, the rest of the model was in remarkably good condition and will be fully repaired.

After twice postponing the events due to poor weather the Jubilee Quaich  and Caprice Contests were held on 24th August in excellent conditions.  It was a pleasantly warm day with the lightest of breezes.  There were four entries in the Quaich event,  David Hambley flew his E36 Super Pearl; George Blair flew his os19 powered Creep; John Eland flew his Paw19 powered Gloworm; and Jim Arnott flew the Winding Boy, a 1950’s Urlan Wannop rubber design. 

This was the first time that Jim has flown the Winding Boy for a few years. By complete chance Urlan was on a family outing to visit the Little Sparta gardens and they stopped for a picnic at the flying site in time to see a couple of max flights from the Winding Boy. Fortuitous maxes maybe but still maxes.

Maxes were the order of the day and soon all four flyers had progressed from 1:30 max, through 2:00 max , to their 2:30 max and we were set for a four way fly-off.  At fly-off time there was a distinct breeze from the west and a 2:00 flight with a timed d/t descent time was used to keep the models out of the trees.  It turned out to be a very close contest with three seconds covering the podium places.  David’s Super Pearl was first away, closely followed by George’s Creep.  The Super Pearl had been flying very consistently all day and it again produced a nice climb. It glided down steadily with no apparent help from the air and d/t’d at 2:02 from about 20 ft up to land in the hedgerow 3 secs later – a score of 2:03.  George’s Creep went away from the launch at a shallow angle and did not get its normal height, but it appeared to have hit more supportive air and when it d/t’d at 2:04 it was still some 50 ft up and took six secs to land – a score of 2:06.  John Eland’s Gloworm was next away with a good steady climb and transition.  The model was holding height very well. It looked a winner and when it d/t’d it took 10 secs to come down. Then the bad news, John had d/t’d early at 1:55, so his score was 2:05; one second short of George.  Finally Jim launched the Winding Boy. The model power stalled and fell back to earth on the first attempt.  A gentle relaunch on the remaining turns for the second attempt and the model climbed away smoothly but not very high, and it was back down for a flight of 1:45. 

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So George’s impressive  season continues. He has  now flown in seven contests and every one of his flights has been a max.  This has not been achieved with one well proven model but with three different models. He has used his Dixielander, Creep and Gloworm with equal reliability. 

In the Caprice contest, there were three entries.  The winner would be presented with the Bob Grieve Trophy.   Tommy had problems with his release mechanism and did not get going properly. Jim had flights of 1:00, 1:30 , and 1:18 for a 3:48 total.  David had flights of 1:07, 1:30 , and  1:30 for a 4:07 winning total. 

The Finlayson Trophy was held on 14th September in what would have been ideal conditions for rubber models had the direction of the light wind not been directly at the trees.  The breeze was no more than 10 mph, varying between  East and Northeast which is the direction which gives the shortest distance of some 700 metres before the trees at Firpark cottage.  With the max set at 2:30, each flight was “at risk”.  There were three entries;  Tommy McLaughlin, Bruce Duncan, and Jim Arnott.  Jim started early with his lightweight Screwtop design.  The first flight was a good max in neutral air which d/t’d  short of the trees.  As soon as  his second flight started climbing enthusiastically in good air, Jim knew it was in trouble.  After d/t’ing at 2:45 the model took over a minute to come down and disappeared in to the tree tops.  Jim spent the next few hours in the woods.  Meanwhile Tommy was struggling to get a good trim on his two rubber models.  Both suffered power stalls before climbing away and they failed to get near their normal height. Tommy’s first two flights were 2:13 and 1:38. He finished with a max with for a  6:21 total.   Unusually, Bruce was also struggling to get his maxes on the board.  His first two flights were in poor air for 2:05 and 2:08.  A closing 2:30 max gave him the lead on 6:43.  When Jim reappeared out of the woods at 4 pm, without having found his model, he discovered that a final flight of 1:44 could win and he started assembling an Urchin.  The Urchin was untested after a recent repair and this showed with a massive power stall and it plummeted back to ground. Fortunately the model was undamaged in the long reeds and the sub-20 sec time allowed a second attempt. A very gentle launch on the remaining turns saw the model climb away smoothly and return the winning time, d/t’ing early for a 1:57 flight.

It was nice to see Chris Edge out again, enjoying an F1a trimming session with David Hambley.

After the contest, Bruce and Jim went back into the wood to find the lost model and eventually spotted it, 50 ft high in a spindly fir tree -too high for Jim’s poles to reach – so it was abandoned.  A few days later, Jim returned with his bow and arrow and managed to shoot a line over the branches to shake to model out.  That sounds so easy when it was a hard won victory for patience and stubborn persistence.

 I notice that the Finlayson Trophy is following a pattern :-
   2009   Tommy -   2010   Bruce  -   2011   Jim  -   2012   Tommy   -    2013   Bruce  -  2014 it was Jim’s turn again

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This was the second round of the Caley Shield. The position going into the final Glider round is that the  Edinburgh Club lead by 13 secs,  from Dunfermline Club, with Paisley two mins behind.   Perhaps the Dunfermline team manager should have pointed that out to Jim before he set an early d/t on his final rubber flight !

 

 

Power

Rubber

Glider

Edinburgh

6:00

6:43

 

Dunfermline

5:33

6:57

 

Paisley

4:21

6:21

 

The final round of the Caley Shield is the Glider Championship ( Pan Am Trophy ) which is scheduled for 12th October
   

 

The Steel Trophy event was held on the 28th September.  It was a dry day with a breeze of around 10 mph from the Southwest.  These were very pleasant conditions for the time of year with the temperature reaching 17C in the afternoon. There were a couple of notable absentees due to illness and unavoidable family commitments so we were down to three entries.  It was great to see Ron Sabey back on the flying field again, with the assistance of Calum as chauffeur and model retriever.  Flying from the flat area of moorland 100yds in from the road allowed models to fly safely past the corner of the woods.  The max was set at 2:00 mins.

Ron Sabey and Jim Arnott flew W-hobby Superba’s and Bruce Duncan flew his classic Sans Egal.  Ron set the early pace.  After dropping 2 seconds with an early d/t on his first flight, he followed with two maxes for a 5:58 total to set a stiff target for the others.  Jim started with two maxes and was feeling confident as he stepped up for his third flight. As usual his self-confidence was seriously misplaced – after a decent launch in what he thought was good air, his model descended steadily to land at 1:50, eight second short of Ron’s total.  Bruce had a poor first flight which took him out of contention. He followed with a good second flight and then the  best thermal of the day for his final flight to give a total of 5:22.   Ron had retained the Steel Trophy. 

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Bill’s   Chuckie    League

The new format for the chuckie / catapult glider trophy has two more outings to come. The current position is :-

 

15 June

13 July

27 July

24 Aug

14 Sep

28 Sep

12 Oct

26 Oct

Total Points

Jim Arnott

10

7

 

5

7

7

 

 

36

Bruce Duncan

7

5

5

 

5

 

 

 

22

Bill Shanks

5

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jacobite   Progress

The latest despatches from the field indicate that Bruce is again steamrolling this event with another awesome total.  His total features one long flight with his latest rubber model when a d/t failure caused it to fly away on a grand tour of Perthshire.

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Free Flight League

With a handful of events still to come the league is still wide open.  Jim Arnott is leading on 62 points from two wins and six second places.  He can only improve his total if he gets another 10 points score.  Bruce Duncan is in second place on 56 points, also with two wins backed up by three second places and three third places.  As mentioned above, Bruce has a massive lead in the Jacobite which will take him to within a point of Jim’s lead. A further 7 point score would be enough to overtake Jim.  The person with the most wins is George Blair with four 10 point scores in his 52 point total. At the moment George has only 6 counting scores so the next two scores will count in full, so even two second places would take him to a 66 point total.   

The events still to come are the Pan-Am ; the 8th area Classic R/P ; and the Allison Trophy.  Still to be declared are the Jacobite and the Chuck/Catapult Glider contests.

 

Free Flight Newsletter July 2014

                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                                    July 2014

Paisley  Trophy  Event          15th June

The weather for our first outdoor contest of the season was rather a mixed bag.  There was a very light drizzle for the first couple of hours during which time the easterly breeze was no more than 8mph.   A 2 minute max was prescribed initially, but when the rain cleared and the breeze came up to around 12mph, models were at risk of going into woods at 2 mins, the max was reduced to 1:30 for two flights.   The afternoon was pleasantly warm and dry.

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There were four entries

David Hambley planned to fly his E36 Super Pearl power model but he damaged this during trimming flights and turned to his Sans Egal for his contest flights. David finished with a 4:01 total.     

Jim Arnott spent much of the day trimming his new vintage power model, an OS15 powered All American and never fully conquered its eccentricities. His comp flights were made with a rich running motor driving an oversize prop to tame the power.  Jim finished with a 4:43 total.

Bruce flew his impressive new BMFA 50gms rubber model.  A vicious downdraft on one flight saw Bruce miss his full house by 7 secs giving him a 4:53 total. Bruce almost lost it on one flight. The model climbed strongly in good air to achieve its 1:30 max and d/t around 1:45.  However it did not come down, the model was doing a shallow spin and continued to climb in the rising air.  When the lift dissipated, the model settled into a normal d/t decent and disappeared behind the trees at 6 mins.  It was found on the riverside of the North Medwin  near Greens Farm. 

George continued his good form from the British Nats.  This time he was flying his OS19 powered Creep.  It was in excellent trim, turning in textbook climbs which resulted in three comfortable maxes to win the Paisley Trophy.

In the Vintage Event of 15th June,  Bruce was the only entrant.  One max flight from his Leprechaun was enough to win.

The first round of  “Bill’s Chuckie League” also took place.  Bill had flights of 11,12,and 14 secs for a 37 sec total;  Bruce had flights of 25,15, and 31 secs for a 71 sec total; and Jim had flights of  22, 33, and 45 secs for a 100 sec total.

Scottish Nationals           June  28/29

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The weather on Saturday was very good and we would have had a perfect flying day had it not been for the unfortunate direction of the breeze.  A 10 mph breeze from the East was carrying models straight at the downwind wall of trees and a 2 minute max had to be used throughout the day.   The events on the first day were F1a, Vintage,  and SLOP. 

There were three entries in the F1a contest which was run with three flights at will with no rounds.   With the assistance of Calum as his chauffeur and model fetcher, Ron Sabey was back into the fray and competing with his usual effectiveness.  Two maxes with his Superba were followed by a 1:30 third flight to establish a commanding lead which won the event and retained the Trophy that he won last year. David Hambley, flying his Sijaesque had one max on his way to a 4:33 total for second place.  Bruce Duncan was third with a 3:50 total. After being plagued with difficulties trying to get his Junior to unhook, Bruce changed to his classic Sans Egal for his third and best  flight.

The SLOP event had been added to the Nats programme for this year to give dedicated power fliers an event on Saturday and to give an outlet for the recently unearthed Dunfermline MAC Power Trophy.  There were four entries.   George Blair produced 3 comfortable maxes with his OS19 powered Creep.  John Eland was also maxing with ease with his K&B20 powered model.  Unfortunately on his third flight, the motor did not stop until it ran out of fuel when a speck in the sky and with the D/t serviced from the same timer it was no surprise when the model did not d/t either and it drifted out of sight still very high. John completed his full house with his second model to join George in the fly-off.  Tommy McLaughlin flew his Geef.  He scored a 1:57 followed by a max  then retired to concentrate on his Vintage flights.  Jim Arnott flew his OS15 powered Dixielander and it going well for the first two maxes.  His third flight was the Dixie’s best climb of the day but really poor air saw the model fall out the sky and land at 1:41.  Around early afternoon John received a call from a local farmer to say that he had found his “glider”.  It had landed at Brownhills Farm just south of Carnwath some five miles away.  At fly-off time the breeze was still directly at the trees and a d/t fly-off was used.  A 1:30 max plus d/t descent time would be counted.  John had a poor motor run and his model was down in one minute. George’s Creep produce another fine climb and took 17secs to come down after it d/t’d at 1:30 to win the contest.

There were three entries in the Vintage contest, two power models and one glider. Jim Arnott flew his OS15 powered All American. After two very comfortable maxes, a poor launch on his third flight sent the climb pattern haywire and came close to writing the model off. It survived but was but on the ground in 39 secs. Bruce Duncan flew his Leprechaun. On his first flight a nice tow and launch set the model into a buoyant patch of air and the Leprechaun was soon climbing away for a comfortable max.  Alas, then there was no d/t and the model flew out over the trees climbing ever higher.  After 13 mins, it unexpected went into a spiral dive and came crashing down near Firpark cottage, sustaining too much damage to for a field repair.  Tommy Mclaughlin flew his Fox25 powered San De Hogan.  With the model not fully trimmed, Tommy was flying it with a rich motor setting to slow things down.  The first flight was a max, touching down with 9 hundredths of a sec to spare.  His second max was also marginal and flirted with a few trees before landing in a small clearing.  His third flight was several seconds over the max and relatively comfortable. It was a master class in brinkmanship as he completed his three maxes to win the McManus Trophy.  

Sunday’s forecast was for lighter breeze and a better direction but at the start of the day the direction and wind strength were very similar to Saturday.  The CD set the max at 2:00 for flight one only,  hoping to review it upwards as the conditions improved during the day.  The direction of the breeze swung from east, through north, to west, and back again and although the breeze remained very light the direction could not be relied upon for any length of time.  The 2:00 max was then used for flights two and three as well.  The events for the day were BMFA Glider , Rubber, and Power.

There were four entries in Glider.  All chose to fly straight tow models of a 75M line.  Ron Sabey again set the early target, flying a Junior.  He dropped just five seconds of the first flight, had a comfortable max on the second flight and finished with a disappointing 1:08 for a still useful and challenging 5:03 total.   David Hambley had a very disappointing first flight with his Old Peculiar which took him out of contention.  He followed with flights of 1:41 and a max for a 4:13 total.  Jim Arnott started with a flight of 1:48 with his Jester, and followed with two high climbing maxes to take the lead with a 5:48 total.  Having finished his rubber flights, Bruce started late in the afternoon with his Sans Egal. Two max flights and a 1:26 gave him second place but were not enough to overtake Jim’s total.

There were three entries in both rubber and power.  With the 50gms rubber limitation in BMFA Rubber and the 9 secs motor run limit in BMFA Power, 2 minute maxes are not a formality, abut all six fliers completed their full houses with some ease and the scene was set for two interesting fly-off’s.  

The breeze was at its lightest and in a good direction when the power fliers decided that they would prefer an unlimited fly-off.  Alan Brown, flying a K&B40 powered own design model, was first away with a fast open climb.  George Blair, flying his OS19  powered Creep was next away. As he launched the model, it slipped in his grasp, was released too straight,  and its climb pattern was ruined.  It finished inverted and was down in 2:39.  John Eland’s colourful enlarged Zeus also had a very poor climb due to an erratic motor run and it reached only half of the expected height.  For one glide circle it looked like it had hit buoyant air but then it fell quickly for a 1:39 time.  Meanwhile Allan’s model was still in the air and was a clear winner.  It eased its way down without getting any help from the air for a nice flight of 4:32.  The breeze was so light that his model stayed inside the meadow.   
            
By the time of the Rubber fly-off, the breeze was once again towards the woods.  The rubber fly-off would be flown to a 3 minute max, with the d/t descent time added.  Having done his rounds with an Urchin, Jim chose to fly his “higher performance” Screwtop in the fly-off.  He was away first. The initial climb was very good but it levelled off about 400 ft and gained no more during the second half of the motor run.  On the glide a stall developed and by the time the model d/t’d at 3:20 it was only 150 ft up and took 13 secs to descend.   Bruce’s model climbed away enthusiastically in good air.  Meanwhile a horrible bang, crunch and expletives from behind told us that Tommy McLaughlin had a problem.  His Urchin had been shattered when his fully wound motor blew just after he pulled out the winding tube.  Bruce’s model continued its climb to some 500 ft and continued climbing in good air on the glide.  Having achieved the 3 min max, it took a full 53 secs to come down to win the Waulkmill Trophy with a super flight.

So the Scottish Nationals drew to a close.  It was a very enjoyable weekend.  With gentle breezes and dry conditions it was the best weather we have had at the nationals for long time.  In the relaxed conditions, models could be safely lying in the field between flights.  Terry Aydon, who had come up from Durham with Allan, added to the gala atmosphere with his sports models. His enlarged KK Pixie powered by a 0.5cc diesel was much admired. As a final bonus we had the pleasant company of David Hearn, out enjoying the Newbigging scene once again.

Newcastle  Toon Moor event    and    Cranfield  Classic

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The Tynemouth Club will not be holding a mini meeting on the Toon Moor this year.

As a result the 27th July date which I had reserved on the calendar for that contest is now available, and it will be used to catch up with the Cranfield Classic which had to be postponed in the Spring due to lambing.

 

Next Outing is planned for Sunday 13th July.    Main event is the Power Championship for the Lawrie Trophy – a combined power event.   There is also a Classic Glider contest , an  F1g  contest, and the next round of Bill’s Chuckie league. 
The BMFA area events are  CP , Classic G, F1g,  Tailless,  B/E,  F1b, and  MV

 

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Free Flight Newsletter March 2014

                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                                    March 2014

Foremost in our thoughts is the wellbeing of Ron Sabey.  As many of you will know, a malignant brain tumour was discovered at the beginning of March. The early prognosis was that the condition was terminal.  However a wonderful surgeon had a closer look and decided that it was practical to cut out most of the tumour. Ron underwent surgery on the 18th.  This went exceptionally well and Ron came out of surgery in splendid spirits.   The roots of the tumour could not be surgically removed safely and over the next few months, Ron will be undergoing a course of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.   We all wish him well in what will be a debilitating battle.  That he is a free flight flyer and therefore a particularly fit and healthy specimen will stand him in good stead.

 

There has been so little flying activity this year that we are still awaiting the 2014 season to start properly.  

 

We had an indoor meeting at Bathgate on 16th of February but thereafter the meetings scheduled for 23rd February and 16th March were both cancelled.  In both cases, the weather was so bad and with no prospect of any likely respite that I  cancelled the outings the day before.   Even trimming opportunities have been difficult to find and I guess that most of you are in my position of not having aired an outdoor model this year. 

The indoor meeting at Bathgate Academy on the 16th February was the Novice Pennyplane contest. The stand out performance and highlight of the meeting was Bruce setting  a new Scottish record for Pennyplanes with flights of 7:35 and 7:30. The previous best was 7:22 by Urlan.  Ron did exceptionally well to cling onto Bruce’s coat-tails with his own very good times of 6:45 and 6:04, which would have been good enough to win many a Pennyplane event. Urlan struggled all day and finished with two 5:00 flights on the board. I lent Peter Griffiths a rubbish model out of my scrap box and he did 4:21 and 4:38 flights.  For a while it looked like these times might be better than I could achieve with my “good model” but I eventually squeezed out 5:06 and 5:45 times. 

The next indoor meeting will be the F1L contest at Bathgate on the 6th April, usual time 11am to 3pm. 

The LRS contest will follow on 27th April, trying out Lochgelly Town Hall.  I take my stepson to indoor model car racing in this hall.  It is a bit smaller than our usual sports hall, but it has an unobstructed roof and will be more than adequate for an LRS contest, and for the trimming of other models.

http://www.fifedirect.org.uk/atoz/index.cfm?fuseaction=facility.display&facid=C4A6072E-7B9E-475D-A30927BA2629AF01

 

I have more detail of this year’s lambing schedule and the implications for our contest calendar.  George and Fiona Donald at North Deanhead have advised that their lambing will run from 20th April to 20th May on the Burngrange moorland to the north side of the road.  Carey Coombs at Weston will not be using the roadside meadow for lambing, but he will be putting ewes with lambs on the moorland to the South of the road from the 10th April.  He will be using the meadow for cows with calves from the end of April. 

As always our priority is to give no cause for concern to the farmers and we recognise that this is a sensitive period while ewes and cows are bonding with their newborn, so we will not have any contests at Newbigging before the end of May, and the Cranfield Classic event will be rescheduled to later in the year.  

With care we will be able to do some short test flights during the period :- 

If we avoid drifting to the south then we can use the meadow and the Burngrange moor for test flights up to the 19th April.  

From 20th April until the cows and calves go into the meadow we must restrict ourselves to the meadow only and avoid drifting over the road. 

From the end of April to end of May we will limit ourselves to test flying from the small roadside area of Weston moor at the Firpark end of the road. We must avoid drifting to the north, over the road.  With care we can retrieve models from the meadow and Weston moorland to the south.

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Free Flight Newsletter December 2013

                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                                    December    2013

Here is the final roundup of the closing events of the 2013 season.

 

The Finlayson and Allison

The Rubber Championship for the Finlayson Trophy was postponed on the 15th September due to poor weather and was rescheduled to the 20th October, sharing that date with the Allison Trophy contest.  The 20th October was dry in the morning with a light breeze from the Southeast.  The rain that was forecast to arrive at lunchtime did not hit Newbigging until three in the afternoon. 

There five entries in the Allison.  Bruce Duncan and Tommy McLaughlin flew Coupes, David Hambley and Ron Sabey flew F1h gliders, and George Blair flew his 1/2A power Witchhawk.  David, flying his Lil Hinney put together three steady flights of 1:44, 1:54 and  1:24 for a total of 5:02.  Ron few his Boomazooma and wrapped two nice maxes around a 1:38 middle flight for a total of 5:38.  Tommy McLaughlin was the star turn of the day.  Three consistent flights with his high tech multi-function F1g was widely predicted to be beyond his concentration span but he confounded all doubters with three fine maxes to win the Allison Trophy.

There were three entries in the Finlayson Trophy.  The early starters Bruce Duncan, flying his reliable BMFA rubber model, and Jim Arnott with his equally reliable Urchin were soon rolling in the maxes and completed their full houses without problem.  After finishing his flights in the Allison, Tommy turned his attention to the Finlayson. His plan had been to fly his Urchin in this, but found his retrieval capacity had been exhausted so he made only a token flight with a Coupe.
As Jim and Bruce prepared for their fly-off at 3 pm, light rain started  and the visibility was getting poor.  Jim squeezed on extra turns on his motor. In the damp conditions with tissue slackening, it looked like the Urchin fuselage might collapse at any second.  He had been hoping to launch at the same time as Bruce, but when Bruce blew his motor Jim decided to go alone.  It was a good climb to some 400 ft in just over a minute and the Urchin settled into its glide.  As it drifted slowly out towards Waulkmill, it faded into the misty drizzle but, with difficulty, it was seen down to the ground at 4:41. 
Jim’s flight was finished by the time Bruce had fitted and wound a replacement motor and was ready to launch.  It was a super flight, climbing to similar height to Jim’s but taking longer to get there and holding up very well on the glide for a time of 5:37. An excellent flight in the soggy conditions.

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Pan-am Trophy and Steel Cup

The Steel Cup was scheduled for the 29th September.     It looked a very pleasant day as we unloaded cars in the lea of Weston Farm woods. However once out of this shelter and onto the moor, the full force of the east wind was felt.
After initial flights, we decided that the best plan was to abandon the contest and to reschedule it for a future good weather day  - to be arranged at short notice when the weather forecasts predict a good Sunday. 

A week later on 6th October, the Pan-Am Trophy event (  the Glider Championship ) was postponed from home due to a squally 25mph Southwest wind laced with rain and this event joined the list  awaiting that pleasant Sunday.

After a few nasty Sundays passed, the very fine day that we were hoping for arrived on 17th of November.  The forecast was for a light breeze of around 5mph from the South and likely to be dry until late afternoon.  The Steel Cup and Pan-Am events were convened.   
On arrival at Newbigging we found that the drift was even lighter than forecast.  Indeed, it was too calm for comfortable towing, as it saw us scampering as fast as our little legs could carry us to get models to the top of the line.  The energy we exerted in towing was offset by the ease of model retrieval as even the longest flights drifted only a few hundred yards.   The format was set for both events as 2 minute maxes for flights one and two, then a higher max of 4 minutes for the third round.  There were the same four entries in both event.

 

In the Steel Cup, there is a choice of F1a or F1b but everyone few F1a gliders of a 50 metre towline.  Ron Sabey flew his Superba, Tommy McLaughlin flew his Sija, Bruce Duncan flew his Sans Egal, and Jim Arnott flew a Junior ( which was a sudden backup choice when he found that he had failed to repair his Superba after a previous outing ).  In the early part of the day there were patches of buoyant air which slowed the descent of some flights.  Rounds one and two were very close.  Ron, Tommy and Jim all recorded two maxes, while Bruce was just 8 secs adrift.  The 4 minute third round, which was delayed until after 1pm when the air was distinctly chillier, would be the decider.  Tommy was first away with a nice flight which scored 1:59.   Ron was next with an excellent flight of 2:43.  Jim failed to get his Junior to the top of the line and it was down in 1:38. Bruce made a very nice flight with his Sans Egal, but it could not match Ron’s Superba, and was down in 2:04.

1

Ron Sabey

Superba

6:43

2

Tommy McLaughlin

Sija

5:59

3

Bruce Duncan

Sans Egal

5:56

4

Jim Arnott

Junior

5:38

The Glider Championship, Pan-am Trophy contest is a combined Glider event where  F1a, BMFA, Classic, and Vintage models can compete.  All four fliers chose straight tow models on a 75 metre towline.  The first two rounds were again very close. Tommy, Jim and Bruce all recorded their two maxes and Ron was just 2 secs behind them.    
In the 4 minute max round, with no helpful air available it was going to be a very close contest.  Jim was first away with his Jester, a large BMFA model.  It was a very good flight and landed at 3:03.  Ron was next away with a Junior.  Another nice flight which landed at 2:50.  Bruce’s SansEgal also performed well but came up short with a 2:36 flight.  Then it was time for the defending champion, Tommy to show his metal. A surprising turn of ground speed by Tommy carried the Sija to the top of the line and it was released smoothly into its glide.  The Sija was gliding beautifully and as it descended slowly it became clear that the result would be very close indeed.  As the Sija touched down, a battery of stopwatches clicked off and showed that he had retained his Glider Champion title by 1 second.

1

Tommy Mc Laughlin

Sija

7:04

2

Jim Arnott

Jester

7:03

3

Ron Sabey

Junior

6:48

4

Bruce Duncan

Sans Egal

6:36

With such benign conditions we were able to complete 6 contest flights each comfortably. Everyone enjoyed good flights from well trimmed models and enjoyed being in contention until the last deciding flights – this was an excellent days flying and a fine way to close out the 2013 outdoor season.

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Dunfermline Club Trophies

The Dunfermline Club have unearthed two silver trophies, both presented to the club in 1954 and last competed for in 1960.  I was asked to run free flight events for them.  This is not such a simple task, given our already busy contest calendar and extensive list of trophies.

The first trophy is the “Bob Grieve Memorial Trophy for Sailplanes to International Specification”.  Bob Grieve was the father of Bill Grieve, the hardworking stalwart of the Dunfermline club.  Previous winners are 1954 – I Donald, 1957 – G Walker, 1958  - George Simpson ( who passed away just two weeks ago ), 1959 – R Beck, and 1960 – A Erskine.   Ignoring the “to international specification”, I plan to use the Bob Grieve Trophy for the one-model Caprice Contest which this year is scheduled for Sunday 10th August.  The Caprice is an easy to build glider which never fails to give a satisfactory performance.  I will bring three spare models to the event which can be borrowed on the day.  I am sure, that gathering dust in other attics, there must be many despondent Caprices which yearn for the breeze beneath their wings again. 

The second trophy is the “Power Trophy” presented to the club by  J Donald.  The previous winners of this are 1954 – I Donald, 1957 -  J Peet ,   1958  - George Simpson,  1959  -  J Beck,  1960 – Peter Brown, who still has his winning Dixielander and may be persuaded to fly again.    I plan to run a SLOP power contest on the Saturday at the Scottish Nats and present this trophy to the winner.

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 Jacobite Trophy

Himself, the Thane of Glaur, has returned to his residence in the Fair City.  Bruce Duncan was the clear winner of the Jacobite Trophy, with a margin of some 30 minutes flight time over his nearest challenger David Hambley.  

League Result

The final table for the 2013 Free Flight League is attached. 
Despite his transport problems through the early season, Bruce Duncan had two wins, two seconds and four third places making up his 54 point total for 5th place in the league.
David Hambley had two first, three seconds, and three third places making his 56 point 4th place total. 
With a late season surge Tommy McLaughlin accumulated three wins, two seconds, and three third places for 3rd place in the league. 
Ron Sabey had two first places and six second places on his way to the runner up spot. 
In winning the league Jim Arnott completed a full house of eight wins in a broad range of classes F1a, CLG, EZB, the Paisley Trophy with a rubber model,  the Lawrie Power championship, CLG again, Vintage Rubber at Nats and finally a Coupe event.

Caley  Shield

The Dunfermline team won the Caledonian Shield in 2013 with unswerving brilliance across the three classes which could not be matched by the inconsistent performances of the opposition

 

Power

Rubber

Glider

 

Dunfermline

6:00

6:00

7:03

19:03

Paisley

5:41

1:13

7:04

13:58

Edinburgh

 -

6:00

6:36

12:36

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Indoor  Flying

The indoor season got underway with two sessions at Bathgate Academy on 27th October  and 10th November. 
There were no contests scheduled.  I used the opportunity to experiment with different model parts, to test different prop / rubber combinations, and to generally confuse myself before the proper contests start.  Ron and Bruce had very good 6 minute flights with Pennyplanes, while I struggled to get 5 mins with mine.  Alan was pleased to get an encouraging  3 minute flight with his heavy first attempt at a Pennyplane.   I tried my new LRS. I thought I was doing better at weight control but it still came out at 0.55 gms, which is 0.12gms over the target minimum for the class. It was a stable model and I managed to get a 4:30 flight, without really hitting the right rubber for it.

The first of the Indoor contests is the Pennyplane event, scheduled for Bathgate Academy on February 6th, at the usual time of 11am to 3pm.  The second contest will be Living Room Stick, scheduled for the Barony College on March 9.  The final event is the EZB event at Bathgate on 6th April.   The Aubrey Beaton Trophy will be won by the flier who accumulates the highest flight times in these three contests.

2014 Contest Calendar

The contest calendar for the new season is attached.    Note that there has been a change to  the BMFA 4th area events where MiniVintage has been replaced by F1h.   
Bill Shanks asked for more Chuck Glider / HLG  events , so I have  included a monthly event where the best five from 8 events will win the Chuck Glider Trophy  ( free entry to anyone who has paid their site fee )

For 2014 the BMFA have split 1/2A power away from F1j and re-launched 1/2A power as a 3-flight contest. 
Rules for 1/2A Power are .85cc max, 8 sec run, plain bearing engine, no minimum weight  compared with F1j which are 1cc, 5 sec run, and 160g min weight.

The finances have been running at a slight deficit over the past two years,  ( reduced entries due to  poor weather and reduced numbers, increased field rent, Jim’s foreign holiday – there are various reasons ). I propose an increase to £15 per annum each towards the site license ( £220 ).  We had only nine contributors last year, but I think that the balance can be made up from contest entry fees, which I have left unchanged at £3.

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Free Flight Newsletter June 2013

                                   Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                                    June    2013

 

Indoor Duration  -  EZB contest

On 5th May, the EZB event was held at Bathgate Academy.   We were once again fortunate that there was no booking in the other half of the hall and the central curtain was pulled back to allow us to access to the whole area.
There were four entries for the contest.  Jim was straight out off the blocks with a 7:14 first flight, followed by an 8:58 second flight.  Bruce had a series of six minute flights with his best being 6:34 and 6:45.  Urlan had a day when he struggled to get his usual high times and finished with best flights of 6:55 and 7:17.  Ron was also returning flights in the six minute area for the first half of the session, but he suddenly found the magic prop and rubber combination and started getting times around 8 ½ mins. His best of the day were 8:32 and 8:45.  Jim did several flights in the 8 ½ min to 9 min range and his best two were 9:01 and 9:15 for the winning total.

In the Indoor League , Jim’s margin of victory in the EZB event saw him overtake Urlan’s three minute lead, to win the Aubrey Beaton Trophy.

 

 

LRS

PennyPlane

EZB

Total

1

Jim Arnott

9:58

10:18

18:16

38:32

2

Urlan Wannop

10:58

12:38

14:12

37:48

3

Ron Sabey

6:54

10:40

17:17

34:51

4

Bruce Duncan

 

 

13:19

13:19

5

David Hambley

 

10:41

 

10:41

6

Peter Griffiths

 

6:04

 

6:04

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The  British Free Flight Nationals

The British Nationals were back on their normal Whitsun Bank Holiday weekend. In the days before the weather gods were swithering whether to smile on us or to test our metal once more.  It remained unsettled and we would have to wait and see how each day dawned.  Only two members were able to make the trip this year, Jim Arnott and David Hambley but our mean and lean two man team were in bullish mood, despite having had no flying through the Spring.

The journey down to Lincolnshire was fraught with traffic chaos and we did not arrive at Barkston till 7pm.  It was a breezy evening and we would not have done any test flying had we been earlier.  So we pitched the tents and settled for the night. 

Saturday dawned with a dry prospect and a light wind from the North.  Lean entered BMFA Glider with his straight tow Old Peculiar and Mean flew an Urchin in BMFA Rubber.  The wind stayed light, about 8 mph all day.  There was broken cloud cover giving significant temperature variations and the resultant patchwork of lift and downdrafts.  Lean managed to negiotiate the air well through the day and scored three very nice maxes to book his place in the Glider fly-off.  On one flight the air was poor when the model reached the top of the line, but Lean managed to tow on for long enough to get through the poor air into a buoyant patch and was duly rewarded.  Mean’s day was not so successful. His first flight in buoyant air, d/t’d from high up for a comfortable max. On the second flight, as he finished winding a large dark cloud covered the sun and the air felt discouraging.  After a wait of several minutes for the cloud to pass and for the air to warm again, Mean launched the Urchin.  The air was still poor and the combination of tired rubber and poor air resulted in a disappointing 2:09 flight, dropping Mean out of contention.  His third flight was a comfortable max, of course.

There were seven glider fliers in the fly-off. They gathered at the north end of the runway, with a light 5mph breeze drifting straight down the runway towards the hanger.  An acrid smell of smoldering silage from the farmyard upwind hung in the air.  The short 10 minute fly off period gives little opportunity for lift finding.  When the hooter sounded the modern circle tow gliders of John Carter, Phil Ball, and Pete Williams took to the air and moved downwind in search of lift or the opportunity to piggy back, The straight tow model fliers eye-balled the sky and each other and awaited a hint of lift.  Someone blinked and the sky was suddenly full of gliders, and the Old Peculiar was right there in the mix.  Two models had found positive rising air,  Chris Parry’s V-Dihedral model and Dave Cox’s Loner. David’s Old Peculiar was circling in between these two, surely it must climb away.  It held line height for about two minutes and then came down slowly for a very good flight of 4:56, landing on the southern fringe of the airfield.  Unfortunately it was only enough for fourth place as Pete Williams scored 7:28, Dave Cox scored 8:47, and Chris Parry’s model had a fabulous 21:22 winning flight.
 
Sunday was a dry day with a 10 mph breeze from the West, as Mean and Lean prepared to fly in the F1a event.  They started very well indeed with maxes in rounds 1 and round 2, to be joint leaders along with about half of the field.  Then the day deviated from the planned script when Mean dropped two seconds with a 2:58 flight in round three, and Lean hit really poor air for a 1:30 flight.  Seven fliers still had their full scores.  A max in round 4 kept Mean just in the frame in 5th place behind four full scores;  but a poor last flight erased even that slim chance.  Three fliers completed their five maxes and Doug Bartle won with a  3:47 fly-off  time.  Mean finished in 10th place while Lean was 14th.

The shining stars on Sunday were Mick Quinn and Peter Martin.  Mick won the SLOP fly-off with a fantastic 19:46 flight, and then half an hour later he won the fly-off for Vintage Power/Rubber with a 4:25 flight from his San De Hogan.  Peter was one of three fliers in the F1b fly-off.  The CD had set a 7 min max for the first round fly-off.  Peter achieved this max and was 4 mins clear of Mike Evatt in second place.

On Monday , the weather became more what we revel in. The wind speed averaged 15mph and was gusting to 25/30 mph.  The wind was coming from the Southwest, up the rise from Belton village and over the trees at the edge of the field.  The turbulence was terrible.  The CD reduced the maxes to keep models on the field, setting them at 1:30 for the mini events and 2:00 for the Vintage and Classic events.  Fortunately,  the rain that was forecast stayed away.  The Mean and Lean maxing machines braced themselves for a strenuous day. 

Lean flew in F1h and Classic Glider.  Flying one model after another to save on retrieval effort,  he got off to a very good start with first flight maxes from both.  On such a day, getting the flight away in the wind and turbulence is one problem but damage from cartwheel landings is as big a risk and David found that both his Little Hinney and Caprice were broken on landing.  David’s alternative Classic Glider is his Sans Egal but the conditions were too rough to fly this – and getting rougher as the wind speed had increased to 20 mph by lunchtime.  The fuselage damage on the Caprice could be repaired.  After waiting in the hope that the wind would abate, the repaired Caprice was taken out for a second flight around 3 pm.  With David scampering towards it like Usain Bolt, the model whisked to the top of the line and flew off – everyone expected the wings to fold.  The repair had not affected the model’s trim and it held on to a nice patch of air to return a second max.  This time it flew over the compound into the fields beyond and landed safely.  The wind had abate a few mph by 5pm when David third flight was made, but again he did very well to get the Caprice up and off safely.  This time the air was not helpful and a 1:26 flight was the outcome.  When the scores were all in, only one flier had achieved a full house, Colin Foster. Andy Crisp was second on 5:53 and David’s efforts were rewarded with the third podium spot.

Mean flew in Mini-Vintage with a Gollywock.  On the first flight, the climb was little tight to the right as the Gollywock fought it’s way through the turbulence to a good height. The glide was then too straight but it was a comfortable max and it d/t’d down into the compound.  After small adjustments the second flight was in a better trim and a further max was scored.  After waiting till 5pm in the hope of the wind abating, the third flight was taken and the Gollywock again performed nicely to qualify for the fly-off with a comfortable max, d/t’ing down into the field behind the compound.  When Mean returned with his model at quarter past six, he discovered that the 10 minute Mini-Vintage fly-off  period was just starting. There were seven fliers in the fly-off.  After a quick change of motor and the model was wound and launched with a few minutes to spare.  The Gollywock climbed well and looked set for a 3 minute plus flight. Then it suddenly hit a pocket of dropping air,  probably some rolling over turbulence from the terrain. It lost 150ft in a few seconds, recovering about 50 ft up and gliding in for a disappointing 2:14 flight.  As the scores came in it appeared that everyone had struggled. The winning score was 2:30 from Mike Sanderson, second was Phil Ball with 2:18, and Jim’s time was enough for third place.

Overall it was a very good British Nationals, with excellent weather on two of the three days.  Two third places from our small team was a good result.   We were right in contention in most of our events until the late stages and had Lady Luck smiled more favourably it could easily have been so much better.

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Newbigging   16th June

What a perfect day for free flight flying.  The light westerly breeze of about 3 mph allowed max flights to be made without going into the trees, half a mile downwind.  It was dry all day, although the clouds thickened and threatened rain in mid-afternoon. The main event of the day was the Paisley Trophy, postponed from May due to the lambing.  The other events were a chuck glider/catapult glider contest and the various  BMFA 4th area events.   

The Paisley Trophy allows a free choice of model; rubber, glider, or power; vintage , classic, or modern; to compete in a combined event.  When the event was originally run as a Paisley Club event, participants had to make one flight with a rubber model, one with a power model, and one with a glider but we are no longer that prescriptive.     There were seven entries ; three flying power models, two flying rubber and two flying gliders.  The max was set at 2:30.  In the benign conditions, six flyers achieved the max on their first flight.  Of those six, four scored a second max on their next flight.  Allan Brown, flying a classic Lucky Lindy powered by a Veco19, and Jim Arnott, flying an own design rubber model, completed their third max.  Bruce Duncan, flying his own design rubber model, and Ron Sabey, flying a straight tow Junior F1a, both hit poor air on their third flights to miss the fly-off and finish 3rd and 4th.  By fly-off time the breeze had backed round to be Southerly and the full expanse of the moor lay open, inviting an unlimited fly-off.  Allan’s Lucky Lindy was damaged when landing on it’s third flight and he used a BMFA power model for the fly-off, a Contrick powered by Russian copy of an OPS21 as used in R/C Club20 racing.  Allan launched immediately at the start of the fly-off. It was a good fast climb of his 9 sec engine run and the model looked to be in good air.   Jim finished winding his “Screwtop”, squeezing on an extra 100 turns and launched a few minutes later. The model climbed away purposefully. It continued climbing in good air for two minutes to reach about 800 ft when the prop folded and it settled into its notably slow glide.  Allan’s power model had moved out of the lift and it descended steadily to record a 4:38 flight time.  Jim’s model was holding height as it slowly drifted away toward Waulkmill. The minutes passed by and it continued to hold height. After about twelve minutes it started to descend slowly. As it sank into the valley just beyond the Westruther Burn, it was clocked off at 18:40, a fabulous winning flight and all the more enjoyable by having been visible to the naked eye throughout.

1

Jim Arnott

Screwtop 17

2:30

2:30

2:30

7:30

18:40

2

Allan Brown

Lucky Lindy/ Contrick

2:30

2:30

2:30

7:30

4:38

3

Bruce Duncan

BoPeepPeep

2:30

2:30

2:24

7:24

 

4

Ron Sabey

Junior

2.30

2:30

2:11

7:11

 

5

George Blair

Dixielander

2:30

1:45

2:30

6:45

 

6

David Hambley

 

0:57

2:30

1:26

4:53

 

7

Mick Quinn

Dixielander

2:30

1:00

 

3:30

 

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In the other events there were two entries in mini-vintage and three entries in the HLG/CLG. In Mini-vintage Tommy had flights of 1:23 and 1:24 with his Pinocchio and Mick Quinn won with two maxes and a 1:53 with his Dynamite.   In HLG/CLG , all three fliers used the catapult option.  Defending his trophy, Bill Shanks put together a series of 15, 35, 17, 15, and 29 secs for a 111 second total.  Allan Brown was second with flights of 44, 45, 40, 35, 37 for a 201 second total.  Jim Arnott managed to complete five 45 sec maxes for a winning 225 total.

 New Roadside Fence
The Estate have built a new fence along the whole north side of the road.  There is no longer a middle gate.  They will be installing one stile as a crossing point for us in the near future.  In the meantime I will be taking two decorators stepladders to Newbigging with me.  I will bind these together either side of the fence at a suitable crossing point to protect the fence.  This crossing point, along with the East and West gates will be the only places at which we enter and leave the moor.  We must not be seen climbing over the newly installed fence.  If you are out trimming at Newbigging please respect the estates wishes and only use the gates.

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Free Flight Newsletter April 2013

                                 Scottish  Aeromodellers  Association

Free  Flight  Newsletter                                                                    April    2013

Indoor Events

On 17th February the Pennyplane contest was held.  We tried out a new venue, the Sports Hall at Bathgate Academy.  We had booked half the hall, which would give us a floor area of 49 ft by 120 ft, but we were fortunate that the second half of the hall was unused and the central curtain was cleared to allow us twice this floor space. The roof girders started at around 30 feet and the area above was a jungle of lights and retracted equipment so we flew with the “Lochgelly rules” with any flight flying over a girder was disqualified.  Careful altitude control was required to gently climb to the girders and knock off them without going over.  There was very little drift in the hall which was unsurprising as outside there was little wind.  Peter Griffiths and Jock Sanderson were invited to join us and try out the hall for indoor radio.

There were five entries in the Pennyplane contest – Urlan Wannop, Ron Sabey, David Hambley, Jim Arnott, and Peter Griffiths ( having a go with one of Urlan’s models ) .    Ron, Jim, and Urlan were soon returning  flights around the 5 minute mark and it looked like being a close contest. David was getting to grips with his model and progressed quickly upwards from 2 mins to over 4 mins.  Peter was well pleased to get a couple of flights over the three minute mark. While Ron and Jims’ efforts peaked with best flights of 5:27 and 5:20 respectively, Urlan kicked on with a flight of 6:07 then 6:31 to be a convincing winner.  David continued his steady progress throughout the session with a 4:48 flight and then a super 5:53 flight to take second place, by one second over Ron.

At the end of the contest, everyone thought that the hall had been very successful and that we should make some further bookings there in the Autumn.

The position in the Indoor League  is now :-

 

LRS

PennyPlane

Total to date

 

Urlan Wannop

10:58

12:38

23:36

 

Jim Arnott

9:58

10:18

20:16

 

Ron Sabey

6:54

10:40

17:34

 

David Hambley

 

10:41

10:41

 

Peter Griffiths

 

6:04

6:04

 

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The indoor contest at Barony College scheduled for 24th March, was postponed due to the snowstorms making travel to and from Dumfries hazardous.  Trying to reschedule at the Barony proved difficult and we have now booked the Bathgate Academy hall for the 5th May, 11am to 3pm.  This will be our EZB contest day, but we will again make floor time available to visitors with heavier models.

The Great Outdoors

The first outdoor Comp of the season, scheduled for the 10th February was abandoned due to blizzard conditions at Newbigging.  This was the BMFA first Area events.   It was poor weather across the UK and the entries were well down.  13 flew in Combined Glider with Barry Lumb from Morley winning with a 6:55 total.  In mini-vintage which is usually very popular, only six flew.  Phil Ball and Jack Foster reached the fly-off. Phil won with a flight of 3:00.

In early March the UK experienced a week of outstanding calm and dry weather, and at the second BMFA Area events on 3rd March we enjoyed excellent conditions.  There was a light South West breeze and it was pleasantly warm for the time of year.  There were SAA events for F1a, combined vintage rubber/power, and combined HLG/CLG. 

There were 5 entries in F1a.   There were patches of weak lift to be found. The lift was never strong enough to make models rise but it could extend flight times by a minute. The local F1a event was three flights.  In the first round Ron Sabey and Jim Arnott  maxed with their Superba’s.  David Hambley also had a max in the bag, until his model d/t’d early for 2:26 from 15 ft up.  Tommy McLaughlin and Bruce Duncan had flights of 1:31 and 1:48 respectively.  In round two, only Jim maxed.  Ron blew his contest big time – when the unlatched model lost tension at the top of the line and he ran out of space to run upwind,  the model sank back down. Ron fetched back in the loose line and it looked as though he might get the model back down for a second attempt. The model slipped off some 20ft up and then it glided brilliantly for a 48 sec flight.  In the third round Jim , Ron and David all had good maxes. 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

1

Jim Arnott

2:30

2:30

2:30

7:30

2

Ron Sabey

2:30

0:48

2:30

5:48

3

David Hambley

2:26

0:49

2:30

5:45

4

Tommy McLaughlin

1:31

1:16

1:26

4:13

5

Bruce Duncan

1:48

 

 

1:48

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David continued flying rounds 4 and 5 in the BMFA event for a 9:09 total and 14th place.   This event was whitewashed by the Grantham Club. The flyoff  comprised three Grantham club members.  John Carter won with 6:23,  Brian Baines second with 6:12, and Richard Jack third with 5:15.

In the HLG/CLG event Bruce Duncan, Bill Shanks and Jim Arnott competed.  The BMFA rules are far more testing than our usual local event rules, calling for seven flights to a 1 minute max.  Bill’s catapult glider averaged 12 secs per flight for an 84 sec total.  Bruce is still young and fit enough to use chuckies.  By his standards, it was a poor day and his best flight was 27 secs on the way to a 131 total.  It was a bit too calm to generate his usual launch speeds.  By comparison Jim’s catapult model enjoyed the still air and he put together his best ever series of CLG times averaging 46 secs for a 326sec total.  This gave him 4th place out of the 22 entries in the Area event.  The event was won by Phil Ball who was the only flier to complete 7 maxes.

Mick Quinn won the Vintage Rubber/Power Area event with a 6:35 fly-off flight.  I guess that would be his high climbing CS Elfin249 powered Mercury Mallard which so impressed us at Newbigging last year.

It was a good day at Newbigging and we looked forward to the coming season and our next outing with anticipation.  But then the Winter came back and the extension to the lambing season detailed below gave us the gloomy prospect of a prolonged period of hunger awaiting the next opportunity to enjoy the great outdoors again.

Lambing Season and the calendar.

George Donald, the new tenant at North Deanhead advised that the lambing of his main hill flock will be late this year and it will start in the first week of May.  He intends herding the flock into temporary fencing on the moorland to the north of the road.  To avoid disturbing the lambing, he asked that we bring the contest scheduled for 5th May forward into April. 

However Carey at Weston Farm will be lambing as normal throughout April and we are not able to use the ground on the South side of the road.

Rather than bring the Paisley Trophy meeting forward into April it is better postponed until all lambing is finished. The Paisley Trophy event is therefore rescheduled to 16 June, when we have an outing scheduled for the BMFA 4th Area events. There will be no contests in April or May this year.

It will be possible to use the site for SHORT test and adjustment flights during April and May. In April models can be launched on the Burngrange moor and must drift away from the road Northwards. In May all test flights must be launched on the Weston side of the road and drift southerly, away from the road. Models must not be flown if the wind conditions are not settled enough for us to be certain that they will not cross the road.

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